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authorJaromil <jaromil@dyne.org>2008-12-13 15:01:26 (GMT)
committer Jaromil <jaromil@dyne.org>2008-12-13 15:01:26 (GMT)
commit07f9887382e0c288de800c02fedd776bf0679b4d (patch)
treec033241af419110462088cca9b7d07861e340624
parentdc8dfa60e098e41ce7d55dd111f63ad00563ccf5 (diff)
start at multilanguage localised build system
(not yet ready, some problems with including images...)
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diff --git a/dynebolic/EN/audio.sgml b/dynebolic/EN/audio.sgml
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+<chapter>
+<title>Audio production</title>
+<subtitle>Play, record edit and stream your audio</subtitle>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Audio </primary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<para>
+This distribution is full with audio software to do all kind of things:
+electronic music, sound processing, voice effects, interviews and more.
+And there is one important thing that makes this system superior to any
+other commercial solution: there is no competition :)
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Most of the audio applications in dyne:bolic can be connected together,
+input to output, in order to form a chain of tools processing the sound:
+this is done thanks to a technologies like JACK and the Advanced Linux
+Sound Architecture. Instead of keeping separated the tasks of every
+single application, now it is possible to take advantage of the great
+variety of approaches that a GNU/Linux system like dyne:bolic has to
+offer.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+This revolutionary approach will surely pay you back the effort to
+be introduced to its use, a good starting point is the Spot perspective
+on technology at <ulink url="http://spot.river-styx.com/viewarticle.php?id=14"></ulink>
+and <ulink url="http://spot.river-styx.com/viewarticle.php?id=17"></ulink>.
+</para>
+
+<section>
+<title>Play</title>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Audio </primary>
+<secondary> Formats </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+This operating systems provides players for many audio formats
+available around out of the box: WAV, MIDI, MP3, OGG / VORBIS, MOD, XM, FLAC, SPEEX
+and even more can be played out or re-encoded, switching between formats.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Audio </primary>
+<secondary> Xmms </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+The <emphasis>Xmms</emphasis> player is a practical audio player with
+a minimal and intuitive playlist manager, can play online radio
+streams and local files and can be skinned or customized with plugins
+as you like.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Audio </primary>
+<secondary> Amarok </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>Amarok</emphasis> is a fully featured personal jukebox,
+handling the collection of your audio and downloading automatically
+printable lables and lyrics of your favourite music. Let it explore
+your collection of audio so that it will let you search for keywords,
+memorize your preferences and guess playlists out of your favourite
+music. It makes it a perfect interface for a jukebox station!
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Audio </primary>
+<secondary> Timidity </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>Timidity</emphasis> is a midi synthetizers using GUS patches
+to render your MIDI files into audio files, as well make you listen to
+MIDI partitures.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Audio </primary>
+<secondary> MikMod </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>MikMod</emphasis> is a tracker module player (file
+extensions as MOD, XM, S3M etc.) which can let you listen to
+demo-scene prods, video game music and what's commony called "chip
+tunes".
+
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>Perform</title>
+
+<para>
+
+This section includes software to produce live music, interacting in
+realtime with the applications that generate sound out of microphone,
+midi, keyboard and mouse inputs. All this software requires Jack to
+work properly, so that it can be interconnected in a chain of
+programs, like a virtual rack of different applications.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Audio </primary>
+<secondary> Hydrogen </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>Hydrogen</emphasis> is a drum-machine where you can load
+sample kits of instruments and compose a partiture for them to play on
+a specific rythm. It's homepage offers a collection of many more drum
+kits you can download, go to <ulink
+url="http://www.hydrogen-music.org"></ulink>.
+
+</para>
+
+<!--
+<para>
+
+<emphasis>Mixxx</emphasis> is a dj tool still in development but
+already quite usable that lets you play and mix your music playlists,
+match them to a particular beat and feed in between. It can be also
+configured to be controlled via MIDI and it's skinnable.
+
+</para>
+-->
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Audio </primary>
+<secondary> Jamin </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+
+<emphasis>Jamin</emphasis> is the Jack audio mastering interface, it
+can perform professional audio mastering of stereo input streams,
+equalizing signals with an intuitive and advanced interface to shape
+all frequencies in realtime.
+
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Audio </primary>
+<secondary> Jack Rack </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>Jack Rack</emphasis> is a powerful effect rack that can
+apply chains of audio plugins (LADSPA) on the sound currently being
+played by other programs. Using Jack you can interface it with all
+other performance tools and add one of the more than 200 effects
+available in dyne:bolic.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Audio </primary>
+<secondary> Free Wheeling </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>FreeWheeling</emphasis> is a funky application that lets you
+record and play multiple samples in realtime, so that they stay
+looping and can be overlayed one after the other: is a fresh tool to
+manipulate, sum and and create over recorded sounds, but requires you
+to read some instructions before start using it, since it's all
+controlled via keyboard (and, optionally, midi).
+
+</para>
+
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>Record and edit</title>
+
+<para>
+
+This version of dyne:bolic comes with up to date software to record
+and manipulate audio: it is generally more stable and feature rich
+than the previous, so you'll hopefully notice the improvements while
+using it.
+
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Audio </primary>
+<secondary> Ardour </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>Ardour</emphasis> is the fully featured multitrack studio
+that offers the most advanced interface for your music recording
+studio. Combined together with other applications when necessary (it
+also uses Jack) it can really solve all your needs for audio mastering
+and music production. Check the online documentation for this valuable
+software on <ulink url="http://www.ardour.org">Ardour
+homepage</ulink>: if you are a musician, the patience needed to learn
+it's usage and hotkeys is definitely worth the effort.
+
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Audio </primary>
+<secondary> Audacity </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>Audacity</emphasis> is a user-friendly audio editing program
+suitable to manipulate your audio files, interviews and recordings,
+separating or mixing them, applying effects and encoding in various
+formats. It can also be used to record audio straight away via its
+intuitive interface, which can be commonly found also on other
+operating systems since it is a cross-platform free application.
+A perfect choice to start manipulating audio.
+
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Audio </primary>
+<secondary> Rezound </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>Rezound</emphasis> is a well capable sample editor that lets
+you manipulate with good precision your music samples, record, loop
+and apply effects using an intuitive and complete interface, quite
+responsive also on slower systems.
+
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Audio </primary>
+<secondary> Time Machine </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>TimeMachine</emphasis> is a simple yet very useful tool for
+recording audio, requiring Jack as a sound engine. It is simply a big
+red button: when you press it it will start recording starting from 10
+seconds ago, so that you can record what you find interesting in an
+audio input just while listening. Whenever you press it records what
+you just listened, without the need to rewind the tape.
+
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+
+<section>
+<title>Stream</title>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Audio </primary>
+<secondary> MuSE </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>MuSE</emphasis> is another rasta soft by dyne.org included,
+which lets you stream audio on the internet over various servers
+(Icecast, Darwin and Shoutcast) in MP3 or OGG format, so that
+listeners will be able to listen to your voice and music connecting
+with most available sound players around.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+MuSE can mix up to 6 encoded audio bitstreams (from files or network,
+mp3 or ogg) plus a souncard input signal, the resulting stream can be
+played locally on the sound card and/or encoded at different bitrates,
+recorded to harddisk and/or streamed to the net.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Audio </primary>
+<secondary> Streaming manual </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+A great introduction to streaming and how to operate muse is available
+online on <ulink url="http://flossmanuals.org/muse"></ulink>, while
+even more documentation can be found on <ulink
+url="http://muse.dyne.org">its website</ulink>.
+
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+</chapter>
+
diff --git a/dynebolic/EN/console.sgml b/dynebolic/EN/console.sgml
new file mode 100644
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@@ -0,0 +1,915 @@
+<chapter>
+<title>Command line console</title>
+
+<indexterm><primary>CLI</primary></indexterm>
+<indexterm><primary>GUI</primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+If you really want a fast way to work on your computer to change
+configurations, install software, or work remotely on another
+computer, then the command line is the most efficient way to do it.
+Many people get scared of the command line interface (CLI) as they are
+used to using graphical user interfaces (GUI). If you haven't used a
+CLI before it can be a bit daunting but actually, with practice you
+may very well find it easier and come to prefer it over using a GUI.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+The only key really is to take it slowly, and practice what you have
+learnt. Don't try and remember everything, just use it what you know
+and extend it as necessary. It will all come with time.
+</para>
+
+<section>
+<title>Text commands</title>
+
+<para>
+The command line is the most powerful method of interacting with
+Linux, however if you are not used to it the learning path can be
+steep. The best strategy is just to start using some basic
+commands. Don't attempt to do all your work from the command line
+straight away. Learn a few commands, use them and add to your
+understanding of what they can do over time. Then you can slowly
+extend your vocabulary of commands as you need to. Below are some
+basic commands that you could try starting with.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+Don't try and learn all of them at once. Just choose a few and practice
+them.
+
+<simplelist>
+<member>man</member>
+<member>ls</member>
+<member>cd</member>
+<member>mkdir</member>
+<member>mv</member>
+<member>rm</member>
+<member>locate / slocate</member>
+<member>ping</member>
+<member>cp</member>
+<member>pwd</member>
+<member>tab</member>
+</simplelist>
+
+And some others that would be good to know:
+
+<simplelist>
+<member>ldconfig</member>
+<member>./configure</member>
+<member>make</member>
+<member>make install</member>
+<member>tar</member>
+<member>more</member>
+<member>whereis</member>
+</simplelist>
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+So, lets have a look at each. Feel free to experiment with these
+commands. Be a little careful as it is possible to do some damage to
+your files, folder,s and even the operating system if you are too
+casual. If there is a possibility one of the commands can accidentally
+create havoc then I will make a note to warn you. So try some of these
+out in a terminal.
+</para>
+
+<indexterm><primary>man</primary></indexterm>
+
+<section>
+<title>man</title>
+
+<para>
+This is a good command to start with because this accesses the buult
+in help pages for Linux. <emphasis>man</emphasis> is short for
+'manual' and if you type this command followed by a space, and then
+the name of another command you will get a help page displayed in the
+terminal with a description for that command. For example, typing:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>man ls
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+The above will give you a terminal window filled with information
+about the <emphasis>ls</emphasis> command. The format of this help
+page might be a bit confusing, so just have a browse and don't get too
+worried. The part you need to be interested in most is the description
+of the command (i.e., what it does). To scroll down the manual page
+press your space bar, and to quit the man page press
+the <emphasis>q</emphasis> key.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Try some man commands and then read about the other commands I have
+listed above. There is also another help system that works the same
+way, but instead of typing man you type <emphasis>info</emphasis>
+and the command like so:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>info ls
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+Experiment!
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<indexterm><primary>ls</primary></indexterm>
+
+<section>
+<title>ls</title>
+
+<para>
+The <emphasis>ls</emphasis> command is the 'list' command. You can use
+this to list the contents of any directory you are in. Try typing this
+command in a terminal window and see what you get. Now, one feature of
+Linux commands is that you can add various parameters to them. This is
+quite a simple thing to do, and refines the way you use the
+command. Usually these parameters are added to the command by typing a
+' - ' directly after the command and then the parameter names or
+abbreviations. For example if I type the following:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>ls -l
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+Then I am /passing/ the <emphasis>l</emphasis> parameter to
+the <emphasis>ls</emphasis> c||ommand. The l parameter is short for
+'long list' and refers to a type of format that the ls information
+should be displayed in. This format gives more information than just
+typing the ls command by itself... Try the two out and compare the
+difference.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+You might well ask 'how do I know what the parameters are for each
+command?' This information can be found in the man pages for each
+command and accessing these is easy (see above).
+</para>
+
+<para>
+For the ls command I suggest you get familiar with the formats using
+ls by itself, as well as ls -al, ls -l and ls -lh.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<indexterm><primary>cd</primary></indexterm>
+
+<section>
+<title>cd</title>
+
+<para>
+<emphasis>cd</emphasis> is the most common command used to navigate
+the file-system on your computer. cd stands for <emphasis>Change
+Directory</emphasis>. Try it out by typing ls to get a list of all the
+files and folders in the directory you are currently in. Now try
+typing ls followed by the name of one of the files in the list, for
+example if there was a file called 'me.txt' I could type:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>cd me.txt
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+This will give an error! Why? Because you can't change to a directory
+if it is a file. It's good to try this so that you understand that you
+can't do any damage by making a mistake with cd. To change to a
+directory you type cd followed by the name of a directory you want to
+navigate to. If there was a directory called 'src' listed when we
+tried the ls command, we would type:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>cd src
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+If that was successful then the terminal won't throw up an error. Try
+it with a real directory on your computer. If you fail it will be
+because either you don't have permissions to enter the directory, you
+misspelled the directory name, or the directory simply doesn't exist.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Now, a word about the Linux file-system. Generally, if the system has
+been set up nicely for you, you will be working in your <emphasis>home
+directory</emphasis>. This is normally located in a set place in
+Linux. To find your home directory first type the following:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>cd /
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+This will place you in the top directory on your computer's file-system.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+If you now type ls this will show the list of directories on your
+computer at the top-most level of the file structure.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+There are some important directories here, the <emphasis>man
+hier</emphasis> command will give you an overview and description of
+their meaning; but now you need to be most concerned with the one
+named <emphasis>home</emphasis>. To change to this directory we can
+use the cd command we learned earlier:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>cd home
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+Now if you type ls you will be shown a list of more directories, and
+hopefully one that is the same as your username. This is your /home/
+directory. Now, we have been navigating to this
+using <emphasis>relative positioning</emphasis>, that is -- if I am in
+the top directory and I type 'cd home' then I will be placed in the
+home directory where all the user's individual home directories are
+kept.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+If I was somewhere else on the file system and I typed 'cd home' I
+would get an error. If you need to, you can use <emphasis>absolute
+paths</emphasis> to the directory you wish to get to. As an example
+if I was in some dark corner of my file-system and I need to get
+quickly to the home directory I would type:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>cd /home
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+If I needed to get to a directory under the home directory (let's say
+I have a directory in there called 'adam'), I would type:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>cd /home/adam
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>mkdir</title>
+
+<para>
+This is the command you used to create a directory and is short for
+<emphasis>Make Directory</emphasis>. To use this, simply type the name
+of the directory you want to create after the mkdir command as so:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>mkdir bleep
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+The above command will create a directory in the current directory I
+am in called 'bleep'. If a directory with this name already existed, I
+will get an error and the computer won't overwrite the existing
+directory. Try creating some directories.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>pwd</title>
+
+<para>
+If you get lost and don't know where you are in the file-system you
+can always type <emphasis>pwd</emphasis> a||nd it will tell you where
+you are. This command gives you the location path
+or <emphasis>absolute path</emphasis> to where you are. For example,
+if I am in my 'adam' home directory, the output of the pwd command
+will be:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>/home/adam
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+Experiment with changing directories with *c||d* then typing *pwd* t||o
+see where you are.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>mv</title>
+
+<para>
+This command is short for <emphasis>Move</emphasis>. It is as it
+sounds in that mv allows you to move files around on the
+file-system. This command is like the 'cut' and 'paste' actions from
+Mac and Windows rolled into one. To use mv you must first type the
+command, followed by the file you want to move (in absolute paths or
+relative paths including the filename) and then the place where you
+want to move the file to (in absolute or relative paths). For example,
+if I wanted to move a file 'me.txt' from my current directory to the
+'/usr/bin' directory I would type the following:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>mv me.txt /usr/bin
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+<emphasis>Note</emphasis>: I don't have to type the filename in the
+path name where I want to move the file unless I also wish to change
+the name of the file. If for example while I was moving 'me.txt' I
+wanted to change the filename to "you.txt" I would type:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>mv me.txt /usr/bin/you.txt
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+If I just wanted to rename the file and not move it I could use mv to
+rename the file without moving it by typing this:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>mv me.txt you.txt
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Note that when you use mv yo||u are <emphasis>moving</emphasis> the
+file not copying it, so the original will be moved and won't exist in
+the same place you moved it from. Now, also be a bit careful because
+<emphasis>you can overwrite files accidentally</emphasis>, if for
+example I moved one file to a directory with a file of the same name,
+then the file I am moving will overwrite that file. Then you could be
+in trouble... so just be a wee bit careful.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+
+<section>
+<title>rm</title>
+
+<para>
+On the other hand, here is a command you should be <emphasis>very
+careful</emphasis> about using. rm is short
+for <emphasis>Remove</emphasis>, and is the command you use if you
+wish to delete a file or directory (and its contents). To use this
+command type 'rm' followed by the name of the file you wish to destroy
+for good. To remove a directory you can use the same command with the
+parameter -R like so:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>rm -R directoryname
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+Where /directoryname/ is of course the name of the directory you wish
+to remove. You can also use <emphasis>rmdir</emphasis> for this which
+(you guessed it) is short for remove directory. <emphasis>Be EXTREMELY
+careful when using these commands</emphasis>, if used unwisely it
+could be the end of your operating system.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>locate</title>
+
+<para>
+These commands help you <emphasis>find files on your
+file-system</emphasis>. The location of all files on your system are
+stored in a database which is updated periodically by using the
+updatedb command. To find a file simply type 'locate' followed by
+part of the name of the file or directory you are looking for. For
+example if I am looking for the file "icecast.conf" I would type:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>locate icecast.conf
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+If I don't get any reply from typing this it means that either the
+file doesn't exist on my system or it exists but my database doesn't
+know where it is. In this later scenario I would type updatedb and try
+again.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+With locate you can't destroy anything so experiment as much as you
+like. Sometimes updatedb might take a while to run if you haven't run
+the command recently or if you have a slow machine, it can also use a
+lot of CPU power on slow machines so never use it while you are doing
+something else 'mission critical' on your machine.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+You might also like to experiment
+with <emphasis>whereis</emphasis>, <emphasis>which</emphasis> and
+<emphasis>find</emphasis> to look for files on your system.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>cp</title>
+
+<para>
+This is short for ...guesses?...<emphasis>copy</emphasis>. Use it like
+'mv' , the only difference is that it leaves the original file where
+it was while also creating a copy.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>ping</title>
+
+<para>
+Not usually included in the top 10 commands you need to know but its
+handy if you need to know if you are online. <emphasis>ping</emphasis>
+sends a request to any computer on the net, if that computer gets the
+request it will respond. Type 'ping' followed by a URL that you know,
+for example it might be a good idea to try the following:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>ping www.google.com
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+If that computer gets the request you will get some information coming
+back through the terminal... this will keep scrolling so to stop it
+type <emphasis>ctrl + c</emphasis> and it will halt the ping process.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+If you get no response from ping then you are probably
+offline. However, some machines online don't answer ping requests for
+security and other reasons... so make sure you really know that the
+machine you are pinging does reply to ping requests.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Also, some internet connections won't allow ping traffic... for
+example, while I am writing this I am in an internet cafe in
+Riga,...its a fast connection but I can't ping, this is perhaps
+because they think only evil hackers use ping so they have some
+paranoid network security disallowing all sorts of useful things....
+</para>
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>tab</title>
+
+<para>
+Tab is not so much a command as a keystroke... every keyboard has
+a <emphasis>tab key</emphasis>, and its a very useful thing to have in
+GNU/Linux. You might have used this keystroke before to indent words
+in a word processor. You can still do this in GNU/Linux word
+processors, but when you use tab in the Linux terminal it becomes such
+a time saver that when you master it you will be using it all the
+time.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Essentially the tab keystroke is like
+an <emphasis>auto-complete</emphasis>. If, for example, I want to move
+the file 'dsjkdshdsdsjhds_ddsjw22.txt' somewhere with the 'mv' command
+I can either type out every letter of the stupid filename, or I can
+type 'mv' (for 'move') followed by the first few letters of the
+filename and press 'tab'. The rest of the filename will be
+automagically filled in. If the filename is not filled in it means
+that there are several files (or directories) that start with those
+first few letters I typed. To remedy this I could type a few more
+letters of the filename and press tab again, or to help me out I could
+press *tab* twice and it will give me a list of files that start with
+those letters.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Tab is your friend, use it a lot.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>Other Commands</title>
+
+<para>
+At the beginning of this section I said there where a few 'other'
+commands that might also be good to know, they were:
+
+<simplelist>
+<member>ldconfig</member>
+<member>./configure</member>
+<member>make</member>
+<member>make install</member>
+<member>tar</member>
+<member>more</member>
+<member>whereis</member>
+</simplelist>
+
+I have already talked about some of them, namely *whereis* and
+*updatedb*. The others might be useful if you are installing software.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+More is use if you want to control the overly verbose output of any
+command to the terminal. If for example, I am in a directory which
+contains 1000 files and I type 'ls' the output of the command won't
+fit nicely into my little terminal window so it will go scrolling past
+faster than is useful. To slow it down so I can read the output we
+follow the command with more like so:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>ls | more
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+If I used this in my 1000 file directory I get one page at a time of
+output and pressing the space-bar shows the next page. Pressing 'q'
+quits more. Ok, so you might be wondering what the funny straight line
+is in the above command... well, this is known as
+the <emphasis>pipe</emphasis> command.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Pipe allows you to combine commands together to control the kind of
+output you get, usually its used to refine a command (which is what
+the command parameters also do). So, when you get really fluent with
+these commands you can write things that look more like equations but
+are really efficient ways of using standard commands... pipe will be
+central to enhancing your efficiency.
+</para>
+
+
+</section>
+
+
+</section> <!-- text commands -->
+
+<section>
+<title>Linux File Structure</title>
+
+<para>
+If you open your terminal and type the following (followed by pressing
+the 'return' button):
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>cd /
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+You will be placed in the top directory of the Linux file system. If you
+then type:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>ls -al
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+You will see something similar to this:
+
+<screen>
+total 80
+drwxr-xr-x 19 root root 4096 Oct 9 13:57 .
+drwxr-xr-x 19 root root 4096 Oct 9 13:57 ..
+drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Oct 5 09:31 bin
+drwxr-xr-x 3 root root 4096 Oct 9 21:47 boot
+drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 0 Jan 1 1970 dev
+drwxr-xr-x 71 root root 4096 Oct 15 11:35 etc
+drwxr-xr-x 4 root root 4096 Oct 9 19:21 home
+drwxr-xr-x 8 root root 4096 Sep 18 23:29 lib
+drwx------ 2 root root 16384 Sep 18 20:06 lost+found
+drwxr-xr-x 9 root root 4096 Oct 9 16:36 mnt
+drwxr-xr-x 9 root root 4096 Oct 8 23:20 opt
+dr-xr-xr-x 64 root root 0 Oct 15 11:35 proc
+drwx------ 75 root root 8192 Oct 15 12:35 root
+drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Sep 23 18:58 sbin
+drwxr-xr-x 9 root root 0 Oct 15 11:35 sys
+drwxrwxrwt 60 root root 4096 Oct 15 12:36 tmp
+drwxr-xr-x 17 root root 4096 Oct 5 09:31 usr
+drwxr-xr-x 15 root root 4096 Oct 9 13:57 var
+</screen>
+
+<para>
+The above listing is a fairly standard directory structure for Linux.
+Each name on the far right represents a directory, and each directory
+contains files and directories that are specific to that
+directory. the 'lib' directory, for example contains code libraries
+that the software on your system uses. For now you only need to be
+concerned with one directory: the 'home' directory. This directory
+contains folders that have names corresponding to each user of the
+machine. If you log in as 'adam' for example then you will be logged
+into a directory in the 'home' directory with the same name as your
+username (i.e., 'adam' in this example).
+</para>
+
+<para>
+The important thing to be aware of right now is this Linux directory
+structure. The other important thing is that Linux is mostly comprised
+of text files, so you can change almost every part of Linux - how it
+looks and works - by just editing the appropriate text file. In
+Windows and Macintosh environments you would usually do these kind of
+changes through small applications with a graphic user interface
+(GUI). In Windows, for example, if you want to change the resolution
+of your display you use the 'display' control panel located in the
+'control panels' directory. In Linux you can do this by editing a text
+file.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+This has some advantages - one is that it gives you a lot more
+control. But it also has some disadvantages - it can be difficult to
+learn which files to edit and what to change. Sometimes, to ease the
+transition to Linux from other operating systems, you will find there
+are configuration softwares for Linux installed on your system that
+use a GUI (Graphical User Interface) similar to Macintosh and
+Windows. This is not always the case however, and so eventually you
+will find yourself doing this manually with a text editor.
+</para>
+
+</section> <!-- linux file structure -->
+
+
+<section>
+<title>Text Editors</title>
+
+<para>
+If you don't know how to use a text editor in Linux then you can't
+really get too far. Reading 'README' files and 'INSTALL' files will be
+a necessity quite early on when learning Linux on the command line.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Text editors is a topic that many books have been written about. So,
+how do we cover it here and do it justice... well its tricky. We can
+at best get a superficial glimpse. We will arbitrarily choose a
+couple: <emphasis>nano</emphasis> and <emphasis>vim</emphasis>. We
+will also look at <emphasis>less</emphasis> which is not an editor but
+is a command that allows you to read files on your system.
+
+
+<section>
+<title>less</title>
+
+<para>
+Lets start with 'less'. This is a command that opens text files for
+reading only. If, for example, the directory you are currently working
+in has a file called 'README', then try this command:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>less README
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+and you should see something like this in the terminal:
+
+
+less.jpg
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+To scroll use the <emphasis>up and down arrows</emphasis>, and to quit
+just type <emphasis>q</emphasis>
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Remember that less will only allow you to read files. To edit files
+you will need a text editor or word processor (Sometimes there isn't
+much difference between the two).
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>vim</title>
+
+<para>
+Vim is a text editor commonly used by programmers for working on code.
+When you type *vim* in the terminal you will see something like this:
+
+vim.jpg
+
+If you have *vi* installed you will see pretty much the same thing.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+To open a file with *vim* it is best if you type the name of the file
+you wish to open after the vim command, so that vim opens with the
+file already loaded. For example if we wanted to read a "README" file
+in the same directory we are currently working in then just type:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>vim README
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+This will open vim with the README file loaded as so:
+
+vim_muse.jpg
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Now to scroll up and down the file use the up and down arrows on your
+keyboard. To quit vim press <emphasis>:</emphasis>
+then <emphasis>q</emphasis> then enter.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+There is really a lot to 'vi' or 'vim', and I don't want to get into
+it here, but you should really know how to open a file (as above) and
+then edit a file. To edit a file in vim you need to first open the
+file, and then press <emphasis>i</emphasis>.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Now, I am imagining vim is quite a bit different to any text editor
+you have used before, so perhaps some explanation is needed. Vim opens
+a file initially as a read only file. This means that when you first
+open the file with vim you are not allowed to change the file. Vim has
+then a whole world of commands you can use to work on the file and
+most of the commands are executed by just typing a single letter, or
+they are in the format:
+
+<screen>
+: command
+</screen>
+
+Where 'command' is the name of the command you wish to use. The
+commands are all designated by shortcuts. An 'i' , for example, is
+short for 'insert'. The following is a table of vim commands you
+should know:
+
+<screen>
+command action
+i (only used in read-only mode) insert text
+:w (only used in read-only mode) write changes to file
+u (only used in read-only mode) undo changes
+:q (only used in read-only mode) quit vim
+</screen>
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+In addition, by pressing the <emphasis>esc</emphasis> (escape) key,
+you will tell vim to return to the original mode (read only). You must
+actually press escape before you execute any of the commands in
+vim. For example if I wanted to open the file "README" and then alter
+some text, I would do the following, starting with
+typing <emphasis>vim README</emphasis> in the terminal. This will open
+the "README" file as explained above. Then if I wish to edit the
+file, I use my arrow keys to navigate to where I want to insert or
+delete some text. I then press <emphasis>i</emphasis>, this will put
+me in the insertion mode and now anything I type will appear in the
+document itself. When I have finished making the changes I will then
+press the <emphasis>esc</emphasis> key, and finally to save the
+changes I press <emphasis>:w</emphasis>. This will write the file with
+the new changes. I then need to quit from vim so I press
+the <emphasis>escape key followed by :q</emphasis>.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Now find a file and experiment. If you haven't used something like vim
+before then it might take some getting used to, so spend some time
+working out for yourself how vim works before you really need to use
+it.
+</para>
+</section>
+
+</section> <!-- text editors -->
+
+<section>
+<title>Install Software from Source</title>
+
+<para>
+Well, installing software on Linux is a broad subject because each
+version of Linux has its own package management system. However all
+types of Linux allow the user to install software using the source
+code. However you probably don't want to tackle this process unless
+you know a little bit about how to use Linux commands and a little
+about the Linux file system. If you don't know about these two then
+its better to read up on them first and then return here.
+</para>
+
+<section>
+<title>Uncompress</title>
+
+<para>
+Installing from source works on any Linux system, so its a good
+process to know, and it more or less follows this route once you have
+a source package:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>tar xvfz packagename.tar.gz
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+Where 'packagename' in the example above is the actual name of your
+package that you wish to install. The <emphasis>tar</emphasis> command
+followed by the parameters <emphasis>xvfz</emphasis> uncompresses a
+<emphasis>tar.gz</emphasis> file and creates a new directory with all
+the extracted sources. Now you must change your working directory to
+this new directory using the 'cd' command. Usually the new directory
+name is the name of the compressed source package minus the '.tar.gz'
+suffix. For example, if my package really was called
+'packagename.tar.gz' then after running the 'tar zxvf' command on it I
+would be left with a new directory called 'packagename' and then I
+would type 'cd packagename' to enter this new directory. If you are
+not sure of the name of the newly created package type 'ls'.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>Configure</title>
+
+<para>
+Alright... once inside the new directory, we want to start the actual
+installation process. To do this 99% of the time you will need to type
+the following:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>./configure
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+Ok, so this isn't really a command. Each installation package usually
+has a script called <emphasis>configure</emphasis>. By putting a dot
+and then a slash before the name of the script ( ./configure ) you are
+telling Linux to execute (run) that script. The configure script then
+does its stuff, checking what kind of machine you have, what you
+already have installed, what kind of Linux you are running etc etc
+etc.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+The most common problem that will occur at this stage is that the
+configure script will halt and tell you that software library that the
+new software depends on is missing. This can be a pain which is why
+people invented package management systems. However if you do
+experience this error then you need to use a search engine to find out
+what software the error message is talking about and where to get it,
+then start the installation process again with this new package. I am
+not kidding when I say that this can sometimes mean an installation
+can take days while you search and download all the packages you need.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>Compile</title>
+
+<para>
+So, lets assume you don't get any errors created by running the
+configure script... in which case you are lucky and you should thank
+whatever angel is looking over you...Now... the next command to type
+in the install process is make like so:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>make
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+This command actually makes (compiles) the software for you. You will
+then end up with a whole lot of compiled files which in total makes up
+your software. The 'make' process can take a while depending on the
+speed of your machine and the size of the package sources you are
+installing. Running other applications will also slow down the
+process.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+When *make* has stopped, type the following:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>make install
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+this will install the newly created software in the correct places in
+your system. So now you just need to type the name of the application
+in your terminal window and it should run. If it doesn't run and
+throws an error, a common remedy is to type *ldconfig* and then try
+again. <emphasis>ldconfig</emphasis> updates the system so that your
+operating system knows there are new library files etc.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+</section> <!-- Install software from source -->
+
+</chapter>
diff --git a/dynebolic/EN/devel.sgml b/dynebolic/EN/devel.sgml
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..15b13c1
--- /dev/null
+++ b/dynebolic/EN/devel.sgml
@@ -0,0 +1,425 @@
+<chapter>
+<title>Development tools</title>
+<subtitle>Extend and customize the dyne liveCD</subtitle>
+
+<para>
+
+Dyne:II comes with an SDK to re-master a dyne liveCD including all
+your modifications and to package additional software collections.
+In fact, Dyne:II is a Dyne to produce Dyne.
+
+See it like a Nomad Distribution attached to no hardware. You carry
+your live cd/dvd/usb key loaded. you boot on it on any machine, you do
+your stuff (from a user AND/OR developer point of view), you create a
+new live cd, you remove all your traces and you leave the camp. Just
+walk around the world with your rewritable CD or usb-stick and that's
+it.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+Dyne:bolic is a quite simple and minimalistic operating system (the
+underlying distribution philosophy can be referred to the Slackware
+one and more in general to the KISS principle), all scripted in shell,
+awk and sed from scratch. Function libraries along with auxiliary
+programs are all included in the /lib/dyne directory, where the code
+is fairly documented.
+
+</para>
+
+<indexterm><primary>Architecture</primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+
+In this chapter you'll find documentation on how to create and publish
+new modules, repack a new CD. For more informations and as a reference
+to the inner structure of dyne:bolic keep in mind this distribution is
+written from scratch following the
+book <ulink url="http://www.linuxfromscratch.org">Linux From
+Scratch</ulink> which provides an extensive explanation on how
+everything was put together
+</para>
+
+<indexterm><primary>Programming</primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+The GNU C and C++ Compiler is included along with several scripting
+language and relative toolkit externals as Python, Perl, Tcl/Tk and
+Ruby. Also 3 different integrated development environments are
+included for visual programming: <emphasis>Glade</emphasis> working
+with GTK and C, <emphasis>Fluid</emphasis> working with Fltk and C++,
+<emphasis>Gambas</emphasis> (provided by the external devel module)
+for basic visual programming. Also
+<emphasis>gtkdialog</emphasis> is used so you can quickly realize
+graphical dialogs and user interaction combining various components.
+</para>
+
+<indexterm><primary>Customize</primary></indexterm>
+
+<section>
+<title>Customize your dyne liveCD</title>
+
+<para>
+It is possible to customize and expand dyne:bolic in various ways:
+creating software modules to add applications and distribute them to
+friends, as well change the behaviour of the system when booting. To
+facilitate customization and development
+a <emphasis>dynesdk</emphasis> tool is provided, automatizing the
+process of packing changes into a new live CD.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+For a good introduction on the potential of this tool you can read
+online Stomfi's article on customizing dyne:bolic
+on <ulink url="http://www.linux.com/articles/54607"></ulink>
+</para>
+
+<indexterm><primary>SDK</primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+To get started with your development first create the SDK in the DOCK
+on your harddisk:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>dynesdk mksdk
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+you'll be prompted with two questions: it is safe to
+answer <emphasis>no</emphasis> in both cases, unless you want to
+change things in the dyne:II core:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>* [?] do you want to uncompress the dyne.sys (y/N) ?</prompt>
+<prompt>* [?] do you want to download the kernel sources (y/N) ?</prompt>
+</screen>
+
+in case you don't give an answer, it will default to NO after 10
+seconds and go on.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+This procedure will create an SDK directory inside $DYNE_SYS_MNT/dyne,
+then populate it with development files that are downloaded from the
+online subversion repository if you have network connectivity.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+With the SDK you can pack modifications to your system inside a new CD
+ISO: that is created out of the contents of SDK/cdrom, you can add and
+remove modules from SDK/cdrom/dyne/modules as well add things inside
+the CD filesystem.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>Create new software modules</title>
+
+<para>Once you have an SDK and some space available on your harddisk
+you can start creating your own software modules to add applications
+to dyne:bolic, see the "Extra software modules" section of this manual
+for more information about features and usage of .dyne modules, now
+we'll go on with some instructions on how to create them.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+First of all make sure you dock your system on a harddisk, then create
+an SDK (see previous chapter). When you have an SDK directory in your
+harddisk you can see it's location just typing:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>echo $DYNE_SYS_MNT/SDK
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+Next step is to create the module directory in the SDK, so let's
+choose our module name first: we are going to create the spaghetti
+module, with the commands
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>mkdir -p $DYNE_SYS_MNT/SDK/modules/spaghetti
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>mkdir $DYNE_SYS_MNT/SDK/modules/spaghetti/bin
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>mkdir $DYNE_SYS_MNT/SDK/modules/spaghetti/lib
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>touch $DYNE_SYS_MNT/SDK/modules/spaghetti/VERSION
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+basically we are just creating the bin and lib directories and a
+VERSION file inside the module, you can do that with any filebrowser
+or midnight commander if you like: c'mon, make yourself comfortable ;)
+</para>
+
+<para>
+The last thing to do is to activate our spaghetti module, mounting it
+on /opt/spaghetti since all modules are activated in the /opt
+prefix. To do that we use again a DyneSdk command
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>dynesdk mount
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>source /boot/dynenv.modules
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+That's it! our new module is mounted in /opt and we have our PATHs
+configured accordingly.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Keep in mind that you need to use dynesdk mount once after every boot,
+before starting development on your module. You can as well open up
+for development an already existing module (your good old gnocchi
+module for instance) with the command:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>dynesdk devel gnocchi
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+You'll be then prompted with a question, if you want to decompress the
+content of the module for development, with an indication about the
+space that will be occupied by it on your harddisk.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Now you can compile the spaghetti software you like with
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>./configure --prefix=/opt/spaghetti
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+or editing the PREFIX in the Makefile in some cases - and don't forget
+the sauce! :)
+</para>
+
+<para>
+To make it easier, when software is built with the usual "./configure
+&& make && make install", you can use
+the <emphasis>dynemodconf</emphasis> command (followed by the module
+name) instead of calling ./configure directly: that will set the
+prefix and more environment correctly, for example to compile
+"aglio-0.5" with flag "--with-basilico" inside our spaghetti module:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~/aglio-0.5 # </prompt><userinput>dynemodconf spaghetti --with-basilico
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+Once you are done with cook... ahem, compiling, then you can squash
+everything into a compressed .dyne module with
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~/aglio-0.5 # </prompt><userinput>dynesdk squash spaghetti
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+and that's it! your new module will be found in
+$DYNE_SYS_MNT/dyne/SDK/cdrom/dyne/modules/spaghetti.dyne and ready
+to be included in the next CD ISO that you can pack with dynesdk
+mkiso.
+<para>
+
+<para>
+Before releasing your module into the public, is a good idea to fill
+up some information about your creation so that people can contact you
+and visit software homepages. That's what the VERSION file is for, and
+it's format is very simple:
+
+<screen>
+name Spaghetti
+desc spaghetti pizza mandolino e presidente scemo
+version 1.0
+url http://tuttifrutti.org/spaghetti
+packager The Crazy Cook http://tuttifrutti.org/~crazycook
+</screen>
+
+Just use your favorite text editor to fill in these fields, leave a
+space or a tab between the field name and value and that's it.
+<para>
+
+
+<para>
+You can add entries and submenus for the user to start up your
+software. To do so create an applist file inside your module's etc
+directory, like for example /opt/spaghetti/etc/applist.
+
+The applist file will list application binaries, descriptions and ways
+to start them up thru flags. Here it follows a description of the
+format, basically a | separated list:
+
+<screen>
+# format:
+# name | description | command | flags | web url | author
+
+# flags:
+# runonce | multi = if there should be only one instance running, or not
+# terminal = if it should run in a terminal
+# manual = if it's a manual entry
+# root | user = if it must be run as root or as user
+
+# submenus can start and end with
+# Begin | MySubmenu
+# End | MySubmenu
+</screen>
+
+for example:
+
+<screen>
+Begin | SPAGHETTI
+
+AglioeOlio | aglio olio e peperoncino | pasta --agliolio | | http://tuttifrutti.org | The Crazy Cook
+Puttanesca | olive capperi e alici | pasta --puttan | | http://tuttifrutti.org | The Crazy Cook
+Pesto | pesto alla genovese | pasta --pesto | | http://tuttifrutti.org | The Crazy Cook
+
+End | SPAGHETTI
+</screen>
+
+You can also have submenus, just use Begin and End once again
+inside. For a complete example see the system application list in
+<emphasis>$DYNE_SYS_MNT/applist</emphasis>.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+In case your module needs to set environment variables (like custom
+paths and general settings for applications) you can simply declare
+them in a env file inside the etc directory. That file can contain
+declarations of environment variables, one per line, which will be
+exported in the running system, for example in our spaghetti module
+<emphasis>/opt/spaghetti/etc/env</emphasis> will look like:
+
+<screen>
+KITCHEN_PATH=/opt/spaghetti/lib/kitchen
+GLOBAL_TASTE=spicy
+COOK_PROFILE=big_nose
+</screen>
+</para>
+
+<para>
+You can include your own home settings inside a module, so that they
+will override the default dyne:II user settings. This is useful when
+you want to change the window manager default configuration (with a
+new desktop image for example) or deliver pre-configured applications
+(with a .config file in home).
+
+To do this you simply have to create a <emphasis>skel</emphasis>
+directory inside your module: all files that are included in it will
+be automatically copied into all users home directories and setted up
+to be adopted for users that are created in future. <
+<para>
+
+<para>
+In your modules you can include any kernel module correctly compiled
+for the dyne:II kernel.
+
+To do this you have to create a <emphasis>kernel</emphasis> directory
+inside your module: all kernel modules contained will be searched and
+loaded if found by the <emphasis>loadmod</emphasis> command, to be
+used instead of the standard modprobe.
+
+In case the module is not naturally requested by your hardware
+configuration (not listed by the pcimodules command), you build your
+own detection or force loading of your module inside a module startup
+script.
+
+You can prepare a script inside your module to be executed every time
+your module is activated.
+
+To do this you have to create an <emphasis>etc</emphasis> directory
+inside your module: <emphasis>all executable files included in the
+rc.* wildcard</emphasis> will be launched at startup, with the first
+$1 argument being the name of the module itself.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+So here is resumed the file structure contained in modules:
+<screen>
+VERSION required file contains information about the module and its sources
+bin optional directory contains all binaries, automatically included in $PATH
+lib optional directory contains all libraries, automatically included in $LD_LIBRARY_PATH
+etc optional directory, contains rc.* startup scripts executed at activation
+skel optional directory, contains all settings to be added to /home/user and /etc/skel
+kernel optional directory, contains kernel modules that can be loaded by loadmod
+</screen>
+You have the power to create, now go make something wonderful! :)
+<para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>Compile a new kernel</title>
+
+<para>
+Assumed that you already learned how to compile a Linux kernel from
+the sources available on <emphasis>kernel.org</emphasis>, compiling a
+new kernel for dyne:bolic is relatively easy.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Just go ahead as usual after unpacking the sourcecode:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>make menuconfig
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+The kernel configuration will be prompted, which you can adapt as
+desired. In case you like to start from the current running dyne:bolic
+kernel as a base configuration, do from inside the kernel directory:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>zcat /proc/config.gz > .config
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>make oldconfig
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+In case you are compiling a more recent kernel, you'll be prompted to
+answer to new questions introduced by this version. After configuring
+your kernel you can compile it using <emphasis>make</emphasis>:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>make bzImage && make modules
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+After you are done with your kernel compilation, packing a dyne:bolic
+kernel is done with a simple command given inside the linux source
+directory:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>dynesdk mkkern
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+The <emphasis>mkkern</emphasis> function of dynesdk will pack the
+kernel and its modules inside <emphasis>SDK/cdrom/dyne</emphasis>. A
+compressed file containing all modules (usually sized below 20MB) will
+be named after the linux version with file
+extension <emphasis>.kmods</emphasis>. The kernel itself will also be
+named after the linux version (reduced to 8.3 chars for compatibility
+with some bootloaders) with file extension <emphasis>.krn</emphasis>.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+The reason of this setup is that, having all the kernel and its
+modules in two files easily recognizable by their extension it becomes
+very easy to swap kernels in a dock: just drop the new files inside
+the dyne/ directory and re-configure the bootloader accordingly. Since
+the .krn and .kmods files are already compressed, distribution of new
+dyne:bolic kernels can be done as-is, just sharing the two files
+around.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+
+</chapter>
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diff --git a/dynebolic/EN/dynebolic-manual-EN.out b/dynebolic/EN/dynebolic-manual-EN.out
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..fa88103
--- /dev/null
+++ b/dynebolic/EN/dynebolic-manual-EN.out
@@ -0,0 +1,64 @@
+\BOOKMARK [0][-]{1.0}{Dyne:II GNU/Linux User's Guide}{}
+\BOOKMARK [0][-]{2.0}{Table of Contents}{}
+\BOOKMARK [0][-]{3.0}{Chapter 1. The hacktive media}{}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{3.1.1}{How to use this manual}{3.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{3.2.1}{This is Rasta software}{3.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{3.3.1}{Streamtime}{3.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{3.4.1}{Privacy and freedom of expression}{3.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{3.5.1}{License and disclaimer}{3.0}
+\BOOKMARK [0][-]{4.0}{Chapter 2. Discover the system}{}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{4.6.1}{Your desktop environment}{4.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{4.7.1}{Access your data volumes}{4.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{4.8.1}{Nest your home and settings}{4.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{4.9.1}{Install on harddisk? Dock!}{4.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{4.10.1}{Extra software modules}{4.0}
+\BOOKMARK [0][-]{5.0}{Chapter 3. Install the medialab}{}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{5.11.1}{Boot from harddisk}{5.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{5.12.1}{Boot from network}{5.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{5.13.1}{Boot from USB}{5.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{5.14.1}{Cluster computer farms}{5.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{5.15.1}{Keep your data safe}{5.0}
+\BOOKMARK [0][-]{6.0}{Chapter 4. Video production}{}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{6.16.1}{Configure your video devices}{6.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{6.17.1}{VeeJay}{6.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{6.18.1}{Play}{6.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{6.19.1}{Record}{6.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{6.20.1}{Edit}{6.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{6.21.1}{Stream}{6.0}
+\BOOKMARK [0][-]{7.0}{Chapter 5. Audio production}{}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{7.22.1}{Play}{7.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{7.23.1}{Perform}{7.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{7.24.1}{Record and edit}{7.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{7.25.1}{Stream}{7.0}
+\BOOKMARK [0][-]{8.0}{Chapter 6. Graphical software}{}
+\BOOKMARK [0][-]{9.0}{Chapter 7. Text software}{}
+\BOOKMARK [0][-]{10.0}{Chapter 8. Communication software}{}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{10.26.1}{Surf the web}{10.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{10.27.1}{Email and encryption}{10.0}
+\BOOKMARK [0][-]{11.0}{Chapter 9. Command line console}{}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{11.28.1}{Text commands}{11.0}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.28.1.2}{man}{11.28.1}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.28.2.2}{ls}{11.28.1}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.28.3.2}{cd}{11.28.1}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.28.4.2}{mkdir}{11.28.1}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.28.5.2}{pwd}{11.28.1}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.28.6.2}{mv}{11.28.1}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.28.7.2}{rm}{11.28.1}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.28.8.2}{locate}{11.28.1}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.28.9.2}{cp}{11.28.1}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.28.10.2}{ping}{11.28.1}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.28.11.2}{tab}{11.28.1}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.28.12.2}{Other Commands}{11.28.1}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{11.29.1}{Linux File Structure}{11.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{11.30.1}{Text Editors}{11.0}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.30.13.2}{less}{11.30.1}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.30.14.2}{vim}{11.30.1}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{11.31.1}{Install Software from Source}{11.0}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.31.15.2}{Uncompress}{11.31.1}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.31.16.2}{Configure}{11.31.1}
+\BOOKMARK [2][-]{11.31.17.2}{Compile}{11.31.1}
+\BOOKMARK [0][-]{12.0}{Chapter 10. Development tools}{}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{12.32.1}{Customize your dyne liveCD}{12.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{12.33.1}{Create new software modules}{12.0}
+\BOOKMARK [1][-]{12.34.1}{Compile a new kernel}{12.0}
+\BOOKMARK [0][-]{13.0}{Index}{}
diff --git a/dynebolic/EN/html/dynebolic-manual-EN.html b/dynebolic/EN/html/dynebolic-manual-EN.html
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..bde266f
--- /dev/null
+++ b/dynebolic/EN/html/dynebolic-manual-EN.html
@@ -0,0 +1,6436 @@
+<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
+<HTML
+><HEAD
+><TITLE
+>Dyne:II GNU/Linux User's Guide</TITLE
+><META
+NAME="GENERATOR"
+CONTENT="Modular DocBook HTML Stylesheet Version 1.79"><LINK
+REL="STYLESHEET"
+TYPE="text/css"
+HREF="dyne.css"></HEAD
+><BODY
+CLASS="BOOK"
+BGCOLOR="#FFFFFF"
+TEXT="#000000"
+LINK="#0000FF"
+VLINK="#840084"
+ALINK="#0000FF"
+><DIV
+CLASS="BOOK"
+><A
+NAME="AEN1"
+></A
+><DIV
+CLASS="TITLEPAGE"
+><H1
+CLASS="TITLE"
+><A
+NAME="AEN2"
+>Dyne:II GNU/Linux User's Guide</A
+></H1
+><H2
+CLASS="SUBTITLE"
+>dynebolic.org</H2
+><DIV
+CLASS="MEDIAOBJECT"
+><P
+><IMG
+SRC="images/logo"
+ALIGN="CENTER"></P
+></DIV
+><H3
+CLASS="AUTHOR"
+><A
+NAME="AEN12"
+></A
+>Jaromil</H3
+><DIV
+CLASS="AFFILIATION"
+><SPAN
+CLASS="ORGNAME"
+>dyne.org / rastasoft / flossmanuals<BR></SPAN
+></DIV
+><P
+CLASS="COPYRIGHT"
+>Copyright &copy; 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 Denis Roio</P
+><HR></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="TOC"
+><DL
+><DT
+><B
+>Table of Contents</B
+></DT
+><DT
+>1. <A
+HREF="#AEN26"
+>The hacktive media</A
+></DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN45"
+>How to use this manual</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN63"
+>This is Rasta software</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN82"
+>Streamtime</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN95"
+>Privacy and freedom of expression</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN106"
+>License and disclaimer</A
+></DT
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+>2. <A
+HREF="#AEN116"
+>Discover the system</A
+></DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN118"
+>Your desktop environment</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN138"
+>Access your data volumes</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN161"
+>Nest your home and settings</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN185"
+>Install on harddisk? Dock!</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN201"
+>Extra software modules</A
+></DT
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+>3. <A
+HREF="#AEN222"
+>Install the medialab</A
+></DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN226"
+>Boot from harddisk</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN262"
+>Boot from network</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN279"
+>Boot from USB</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN343"
+>Cluster computer farms</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN394"
+>Keep your data safe</A
+></DT
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+>4. <A
+HREF="#AEN403"
+>Video production</A
+></DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN411"
+>Configure your video devices</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN426"
+>VeeJay</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN457"
+>Play</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN472"
+>Record</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN487"
+>Edit</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN509"
+>Stream</A
+></DT
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+>5. <A
+HREF="#AEN534"
+>Audio production</A
+></DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN544"
+>Play</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN570"
+>Perform</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN594"
+>Record and edit</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN618"
+>Stream</A
+></DT
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+>6. <A
+HREF="#AEN632"
+>Graphical software</A
+></DT
+><DT
+>7. <A
+HREF="#AEN664"
+>Text software</A
+></DT
+><DT
+>8. <A
+HREF="#AEN704"
+>Communication software</A
+></DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN717"
+>Surf the web</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN752"
+>Email and encryption</A
+></DT
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+>9. <A
+HREF="#AEN780"
+>Command line console</A
+></DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN788"
+>Text commands</A
+></DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN815"
+>man</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN835"
+>ls</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN850"
+>cd</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN894"
+>mkdir</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN903"
+>pwd</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN913"
+>mv</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN937"
+>rm</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN949"
+>locate</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN963"
+>cp</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN967"
+>ping</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN980"
+>tab</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN987"
+>Other Commands</A
+></DT
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN1006"
+>Linux File Structure</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN1023"
+>Text Editors</A
+></DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN1030"
+>less</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN1042"
+>vim</A
+></DT
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN1067"
+>Install Software from Source</A
+></DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN1070"
+>Uncompress</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN1081"
+>Configure</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN1091"
+>Compile</A
+></DT
+></DL
+></DD
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+>10. <A
+HREF="#AEN1106"
+>Development tools</A
+></DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN1124"
+>Customize your dyne liveCD</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN1144"
+>Create new software modules</A
+></DT
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN1226"
+>Compile a new kernel</A
+></DT
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+><A
+HREF="#AEN1262"
+>Index</A
+></DT
+></DL
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="CHAPTER"
+><HR><H1
+><A
+NAME="AEN26"
+></A
+>Chapter 1. The hacktive media</H1
+><P
+>dyne:bolic GNU/Linux is a live bootable distribution working
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>directly from the CD without the need to install</I
+></SPAN
+>
+or change anything on harddisk. It can recognize most of your hardware devices and offers a
+vast range of softwares for sound and video production, streaming, 3d
+modeling, peer to peer and filesharing, deejaying, veejaying and more.</P
+><P
+>This operating system focuses on providing <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>multimedia functionalities</I
+></SPAN
+>
+to surf, stream, record, edit, encode and broadcast both sound and video;
+it also overcomes usual installation problems by providing an easy way
+to <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>run from harddisk without repartitioning</I
+></SPAN
+>, but just copying
+a directory (<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>docking</I
+></SPAN
+>), thus avoiding any risk of data loss and preserving the integrity
+of other systems you are already using.</P
+><P
+>dyne:bolic it is made by and shaped on the needs of media activists,
+artists and creatives to stimulate the production and not only the
+fruition of digital and analog informations.
+Empowered by GNU/Linux and the groovy open source software community,
+this operating system takes birth as a grassroot effort to spread free
+software and the spirit of sharing informations.</P
+><DIV
+CLASS="MEDIAOBJECT"
+><P
+><IMG
+SRC="images/shot-support"
+ALIGN="CENTER"></P
+></DIV
+><P
+>The latest version of this document is made available online at the address
+<A
+HREF="http://dynebolic.org/manual"
+TARGET="_top"
+>dynebolic.org/manual</A
+> and in
+printable format at <A
+HREF="http://dynebolic.org/dynebolic-manual.pdf"
+TARGET="_top"
+>dynebolic.org/dynebolic-manual.pdf</A
+>.
+For more informations visit the homepage on <A
+HREF="http://dynebolic.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>dynebolic.org</A
+>
+where more online documentation is made available.
+To contribute you can <A
+HREF="http://bugs.dyne.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>report bugs</A
+> and
+get in touch with the community of users and developers joining the
+the <A
+HREF="http://lists.dyne.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>discussion mailinglists</A
+> or the
+ <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>irc.freenode.net #dyne</I
+></SPAN
+> chat channel.</P
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN45"
+>How to use this manual</A
+></H2
+><P
+>Far from being complete in exploring the possibilities of each
+single software, you'll get introduced and find basic directions on
+how to use, modify and employ dynebolic in various circumstances.</P
+><P
+>When in need of in-deep information on how to operate a particular
+software, you should consult the included <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>man pages</I
+></SPAN
+>.&#13;</P
+><P
+>The manpage is the name of the manual page describing usage of the
+program, you can use it with the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>man</I
+></SPAN
+> command from
+an <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>XTerminal</I
+></SPAN
+> inside dyne:bolic :
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>man hasciicam</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+it will show an higly informative text about the usage of the program;
+the manpage name usually matches the name of the program executable
+itself.</P
+><P
+>Always keep in mind: the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>man</I
+></SPAN
+> command is your
+friend :) it works in every GNU/Linux system providing information
+about every command, and with all the commands that are around there
+is a lot to discover! for example have a look at manuals like "sox"
+or "convert", you'll find out that you can do a lot of things just
+from the XTerminal commandline!</P
+><P
+>At last, in case you are using intensively a certain software for
+your purposes, don't miss to consult its own documentation and join
+the community of users around it: there you can discover more about its
+usage and development.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN63"
+>This is Rasta software</A
+></H2
+><DIV
+CLASS="MEDIAOBJECT"
+><P
+><IMG
+SRC="images/shot-credits"
+ALIGN="CENTER"></P
+></DIV
+><P
+> Jah Rastafari Livity
+bless our Freedom! This is free software, share it for the good of
+yourself and your people, respect others and let them express, be free
+and let others be free. Live long and prosper in Peace!</P
+><P
+>But, no Peace without Justice.
+This software is about Resistance inna babylon world which tries to control
+more and more the way we communicate and we share informations and knowledge.
+This software is for all those who cannot afford to have the latest expensive
+hardware to speak out their words of consciousness and good will.
+This software has a full range of applications for production and not only
+fruition of information, it's a full multimedia studio, you don't need to buy
+anything to express your voice.
+Freedom and sharing of knowledge are solid principles for evolution and that's
+where this software comes from.</P
+><P
+>Inna babylon, money is the main requirement to make a voice possible to
+be heard by others. Capitalist and fundamentalist governments all around
+the world rule with huge TV monopolies spreading their propaganda,
+silencing all criticism.</P
+><P
+>&#13;This is a struggle for Redemption from existing operating systems
+which always require new expensive hardware for doing the same as
+ever: give us free players but make us pay for producing our own
+voices. And the one who protects you rips you off, as the Arabs say.&#13;</P
+><P
+>Dyne:bolic is a tool to produce and publish yourself, freely.
+There is nothing to consume here, there is all you need to create.</P
+><P
+>&#13;Commercial operating systems always give a possibility to listen - all
+kinds of "free to download" players, but always with restrictions and
+no easy way for everybody to speak out.
+
+The way communication is structured follows the hierarchy of powers
+allready established in babylon's mediascapes and, worst than ever,
+money is the main requirement to spread a voice and let it be heard by
+others.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;Neverthless, proprietary software spreads the dependence from business
+companies thru the populace: whenever we share our knowledge on how to
+use a certain software, we make the people in need to buy the tools
+from merchants in order to express their creativity. This is great
+responsability for anyone of us who teaches somebody how to do
+something with software: the need to buy will be slavery under the
+merchantile interests of capitalism.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;The roots of Rasta culture can be found in Resistance to slavery.
+This software is not a business. This software is free as of speech
+and is one step in the struggle for Redemption and Freedom. This
+software is dedicated to the memory of Patrice Lumumba, Marcus Garvey,
+Marthin Luther King, Steve Biko, Walter Rodney, Malcom X; in
+solidarity with Mumia Abu Jamal and all those who still resist to
+slavery, racism and oppression, who still fight imperialism and seek
+an alternative to the hegemony of capitalism in our World.
+
+ </P
+><P
+><A
+HREF="http://rastasoft.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>Hic Sunt Leones</A
+>.
+And Much Blessings in Jah Luv to All Those who still Resist.
+Selah.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN82"
+>Streamtime</A
+></H2
+><FONT
+COLOR="RED"
+>Employing dyne:bolic for the freedom of communication</FONT
+><P
+>&#13;<A
+HREF="http://www.streamtime.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>Streamtime</A
+> is a project
+of <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Radio Reedflute</I
+></SPAN
+> in collaboration with
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Rastasoft</I
+></SPAN
+>, developed with artists and activists
+from Iraq and elsewhere. Streamtime is a loose network of media
+activists dedicated to assist autonomous networking. Streamtime uses
+old and new media for the production of content and networks in the
+fields of media, arts, culture and activism in crisis areas, like
+Iraq.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;We imagine improvised expressive devices like a CD that turns your PC
+into an on line streaming studio. Imagine a mob that creates a traffic
+jam. Think of the religious policeman in London, the konfused kollege
+kid and the jealous dentist in Baghdad and the jailed blogger blogging
+on in Cairo. Building autonomous networks in extreme conditions.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;Streamtime uses old and new media for the production of content and
+networks in the fields of media, arts, culture and activism in crisis
+areas, like Iraq. Streamtime offers a diffuse environment for
+developing do-it-yourself media. We focus on a cultural sense of
+finding your own way in the quagmire that is Iraq, and its
+representation in the global media. We should not try to change
+politics in order to foster cultural change; we should support
+cultural manifestation in order to force political change.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;Streamtime may take the form of a campaign, a work of collaborative
+art, a current of unheard sounds, unspeakable words and unseen
+imaginations.</P
+><P
+>Remote interaction and ubiquitous dialogues, dematerialized
+communication and participation on the streets. Space in its
+territorial, acoustic and cybernetic dimensions is fragmented and
+recomposed realtime. Hacking codes both moral and digital, forming
+new maps, mutant drawings and unstable skins. Information overload
+can be abandoned in favor of consciousness and collaborative
+practices. Memory has a digital, diverse, horizontal voice.&#13;</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN95"
+>Privacy and freedom of expression</A
+></H2
+><P
+>The distinction between what is public and what is private is becoming
+more and more blurred with the increasing intrusiveness of the media
+and advances in electronic technology. While this distinction is
+always the outcome of continuous cultural negotiation, it continues to
+be critical, for where nothing is private, democracy becomes
+impossible
+<A
+NAME="AEN98"
+HREF="#FTN.AEN98"
+><SPAN
+CLASS="footnote"
+>[1]</SPAN
+></A
+></P
+><P
+>The internet offers plenty of free services, on the wave of the Web2.0
+fuzz and the community boom, while all private informations are hosted
+on servers owned by global corporations and monopolies.</P
+><P
+>We urge you to reflect on the importance of keeping privacy for
+personal data. Our present world is full of prevarication and
+political imprisonments, war rages in several places and media is
+mainly used for propaganda by the powers in charge. Some of us face
+the dangers of being tracked by oppressors opposing our self
+definition, independent thinking and resistance to omologation.</P
+><P
+>People have the right to protect their privacy as much as their
+freedom to express.</P
+><P
+>It is important to keep in mind that noone else than *you* can ensure
+the privacy of your personal data. Server hosted services and web
+integrated technologies gather all data into huge information pools
+that are made available to established economical and cultural
+regimes.</P
+><P
+>Since version 2.4 in this free operating system was introduced support
+for strong encryption of your /home private data with Linux dm-crypt
+i586 optimized Rijndael hashed SHA256, to provide an efficient and
+user-friendly tool to protect your bookmarks, addressbook, documents
+and emails by carrying them back with you, protected with a fairly
+strong cryptographic algorithm. </P
+><P
+>A passkey to read your data is stored inside a file, which is also
+protected by a password. It is possible to keep everything with you on
+a small usb stick, still being sure that the data won't be easily
+recovered in case you loose it. You can also give the passkey
+protecting your data to a friend, to make the data unaccessible until
+you meet again, which can be useful in case of tricky transports.
+You'll find more informations in the following sections about nesting
+and privacy.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN106"
+>License and disclaimer</A
+></H2
+><P
+>The dyne user's manual is
+copyright (c) 2003 - 2008 Denis Jaromil Rojo</P
+><P
+>&#13;Thanks for reviewing and inspirations go to the Streamtime crew, all
+the bloggers from Baghdad and any other crazy place in the world where
+people like us happens to be living, has to live it, and can even find
+a way to survive.&#13;</P
+><P
+>Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
+under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2
+or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation;
+with the Introductory and Colophon sections being invariant, with the
+Front-Cover and Back-Cover Texts clearly stating authorship and
+copyright notices.
+You should have received a copy of the GNU Free Documentation License
+along with this manual; if not, write to the Free Software
+Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA</P
+><P
+>dyne:bolic GNU/Linux is
+copyright (C) 2001 - 2008 Denis Jaromil Rojo</P
+><P
+>Dyne:bolic is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
+it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
+the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
+(at your option) any later version.
+This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
+but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
+MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
+GNU General Public License for more details.
+
+You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
+along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
+Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA</P
+></DIV
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="CHAPTER"
+><HR><H1
+><A
+NAME="AEN116"
+></A
+>Chapter 2. Discover the system</H1
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN118"
+>Your desktop environment</A
+></H2
+><P
+>Dyne:bolic doesn't requires to install anything on your harddisks,
+which can be left untouched while the system is used. Still, depending
+from your preferred way to operate, it can boot from harddisk, CD, USB
+or network (explained the following chapter) and it can store data in
+a single file that can be transported across different media. The
+whole operating system fits on a single CD, to run it from harddisk
+you just need to copy the DYNE directory in it (see docking), while in
+a diskless thin-client setup that can also be mounted via network.
+This makes dyne:bolic very easy to be employed and mantained, while
+there is no risk for misconfiguration: the system comes as it is,
+providing a slick desktop full of applications ready to use. </P
+><P
+>The default desktop manager is <A
+HREF="http://www.xfce.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>Xfce</A
+>, it offers you multiple
+desktops (try ctrl+F2 and other numbers) and a menu that you can
+recall by clicking the right mouse button on the background. On the
+upper right corner you have your storage devices which you can access
+with a click. </P
+><P
+>Inside the application menu software is organized by tasks, so you can
+easily find your way to play, record, edit and stream both audio and
+video, communicate and publish text, webpages, 3d animations and much
+more. </P
+><P
+>Click on <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>CONFIGURE</I
+></SPAN
+> in your menu to access system
+configuration facilities and customize your system. </P
+><DIV
+CLASS="MEDIAOBJECT"
+><P
+><IMG
+SRC="images/shot-configure"
+ALIGN="CENTER"></P
+></DIV
+><P
+>To be introduced to various desktop functionalities you can visit
+<A
+HREF="http://spot.river-styx.com/viewarticle.php?id=8"
+TARGET="_top"
+>Spot's
+homepage</A
+> and read the <A
+HREF="http://www.osnews.com/story.php?news_id=6490"
+TARGET="_top"
+>OSNews dyne:bolic
+review</A
+>. </P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN138"
+>Access your data volumes</A
+></H2
+><DIV
+CLASS="MEDIAOBJECT"
+><P
+><IMG
+SRC="images/shot-volumes"
+ALIGN="CENTER"></P
+></DIV
+><P
+>&#13;You can easily access your files on connected storage devices
+(harddisks, cd, floppy, usb) using the buttons in the upper right
+corner of your desktop, as well your local network shares and remote
+internet accounts. Your partitions are automatically mounted in the
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>/mnt</I
+></SPAN
+> directory, which you see linked in your home
+as <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Volumes</I
+></SPAN
+>. You can read and write on all your
+volumes except for NT filesystems, which you can only read.&#13;</P
+><P
+>Usb storage devices (like usb pens, smartcards and some digital photo
+cameras) can be opened simply with a double click on the usb symbol.
+But beware that sometimes unusual partition schemes can confuse the
+autodetection, so you can try by hand in a Xterminal issuing manual
+commands:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>mount /dev/sdXY /mnt/usb</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+Where you must substitute X with letters (a,b,c...) and Y with numbers
+(1,2,3) for example <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>/dev/sda2</I
+></SPAN
+>.&#13;</P
+><P
+>If you have only one cdrom or dvd player on your computer
+with <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>docking</I
+></SPAN
+> you can have it free for
+use after booting dyne:bolic (see following chapter about DOCKING),
+then you can access, browse, play and rip compact discs and dvd.</P
+><P
+>To have a general overview about the organization of various directories you find in GNU/Linux systems,
+read the manual <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>hier</I
+></SPAN
+> (type "man hier" in the Xterminal).</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN161"
+>Nest your home and settings</A
+></H2
+><DIV
+CLASS="MEDIAOBJECT"
+><P
+><IMG
+SRC="images/shot-nest-main"
+ALIGN="CENTER"></P
+></DIV
+><P
+>By default your <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>/home, /etc and /var</I
+></SPAN
+> directories
+reside in RAM memory: every file and configuration you save will not
+be there again at the next boot.
+
+To save your home and settings permanently you need to create a
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>NEST</I
+></SPAN
+>: it is just a file called "dyne.nst" that
+can be placed on a harddisk or usb storage device and it loaded at
+every boot. You just need to create your nest once, dyne:bolic looks
+for it at every startup and if it is present starts using it
+automatically. </P
+><P
+>The <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>nesting</I
+></SPAN
+> function is very practical to keep
+all the modifications you make to the system while using it (settings,
+saved files, accounts, language, private data etc.) and transport or
+backup them. For example, in case you nest on your USB stick, you can
+boot with it connected at startup, then that nest will be used and all
+your /home and settings will always stay with you, in your personal
+USB stick. This way you don't even need a laptop to travel around with
+your software environment and data, just carry a dyne:bolic CD and
+your nested USB stick with you, wherever you'll be able to boot it
+you'll have your /home. </P
+><P
+><SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>How to create a nest?</I
+></SPAN
+> at the boot screen or in
+your <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Home</I
+></SPAN
+>, click on the
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Configure</I
+></SPAN
+> button, then choose
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Nest</I
+></SPAN
+> (the little icon of a duck). You will be
+prompted to create a nest on your harddisk or USB stick, proceed
+choosing the partition you want and how big you need it: good sizes
+may vary between 250 and 500 megabytes, depending from how much you
+plan to use the system, modify it and open it for other users.</P
+><DIV
+CLASS="MEDIAOBJECT"
+><P
+><IMG
+SRC="images/shot-nest-hd"
+ALIGN="CENTER"></P
+></DIV
+><P
+>Since version 2.4 when creating a nest you'll also see a padlock
+button: press it and your new nest will be secured with encryption,
+you'll be asked to set a password, which will be then asked at every
+boot when you mount the nest. Without that password it will be very
+hard to access your nest, so you'll be granted with fairly good
+security for your personal data. </P
+><P
+>If you nest on harddisk, the supported partition formats are: Dos,
+Fat32, Ext2, ReiserFS, Beos (BeFS), and NTFS (supported since version
+2.5). The nest is just one file created in the /dyne directory at the
+root of your partition (C:\ or D:\ in the DOS filesystem) called
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>dyne.nst</I
+></SPAN
+>. To erase a nest simply delete that file.&#13;</P
+><P
+>Since version 2.5 it is also possible to mount nests after boot: just
+plug in your usb stick and navigate the content of the dyne/
+directory, a double click on the dyne.nst (the duck icon) will mount
+your home and prompt for a password if it is encrypted.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN185"
+>Install on harddisk? Dock!</A
+></H2
+><DIV
+CLASS="MEDIAOBJECT"
+><P
+><IMG
+SRC="images/shot-dock"
+ALIGN="CENTER"></P
+></DIV
+><P
+>&#13;Dyne:bolic solves the problem of istallation in a very simple way:
+there is no installation :) you simply copy a directory and this is
+called "docking".&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;Docking lets you run the system from an harddisk, with shorter load
+time and more speed. With a dock you can also boot from floppy, or
+from a multi-boot partition.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;Docking consists of copying the dyne/ directory from the CD to the
+harddisk. You don't need to change anything in your partition, just
+copy a directory into it: drag the dyne/ folder from the CD on the
+icon of your harddisk, that's it! It will occupy less than 700
+megabytes of space.
+
+After 'docking', you can boot with the CD inside and it will eject
+automatically after the first phase of the boot process, this is the
+sign the dock went well! Like that, even without the need for
+repartitioning or configuring a double boot, you can just switch to
+dyne:bolic using a CD or a floppy, but still run it from harddisk at
+full speed, like an installed operating system - and even better! ;)&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;Of course when you want to remove the dock is easy: just delete the
+/dyne directory in your harddisk!&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;Remember that docking is different from nesting:
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Docking</I
+></SPAN
+> is done to run the system and all
+application from harddisk instead of CD, <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>nesting</I
+></SPAN
+>
+is to store your home and settings in a single file on harddisk or usb
+storage.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;More online information about docking is available on the <A
+HREF="http://lab.dyne.org/Docking"
+TARGET="_top"
+>wiki community pages</A
+>.&#13;</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN201"
+>Extra software modules</A
+></H2
+><P
+>&#13;Dyne:II offers the possibility to be expanded
+using <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>.dyne</I
+></SPAN
+> modules: collections of applications
+that can be easily installed and used. In fact the basic system
+already contains some of these modules, that can be found in your dock
+as the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>dyne/modules/</I
+></SPAN
+> directory.
+
+From the menu, you can see them clicking thru <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>CONFIGURE -&#62;
+DYNE -&#62; MODULES</I
+></SPAN
+>&#13;</P
+><DIV
+CLASS="MEDIAOBJECT"
+><P
+><IMG
+SRC="images/shot-modules"
+ALIGN="CENTER"></P
+></DIV
+><P
+>&#13;Additional dyne modules are available online on the dynebolic.org
+homepage in the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Extras</I
+></SPAN
+> section. Download and
+activate them just dropping the .dyne files into the
+dyne/modules docked directory. Then reboot, that's it!&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;Users can easily keep their modules across different machines, always
+finding back the software they need. Modules can also be used thru
+different dyne versions: just update the core dock and then drop in
+your good old modules.&#13;</P
+><P
+>Download free and open source dyne modules online from
+<A
+HREF="ftp://ftp.dyne.org/dynebolic/modules"
+TARGET="_top"
+>ftp://ftp.dyne.org/dynebolic/modules</A
+>, there are
+many interesting extensions already: office and development tools,
+crosscompile chains, manuals and of course games :)</P
+><P
+>Quite some developers and artists are actively contributing with
+modules listed
+on <A
+HREF="http://lab.dyne.org/DyneModules"
+TARGET="_top"
+>http://lab.dyne.org/DyneModules</A
+>.</P
+><P
+>&#13;When you install new modules, since it is so easy, the only care that
+must be taken is their provenience, since a broken or malicious module
+can access all your system. Of course to install a module you must be
+root. On our website we'll suggest only modules we have tested, anyway
+you're free to choose, it's all up to you to decide whom you trust,
+you just did it by running this system on your computer didn't you? :)&#13;</P
+></DIV
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="CHAPTER"
+><HR><H1
+><A
+NAME="AEN222"
+></A
+>Chapter 3. Install the medialab</H1
+><P
+>This chapter will describe various advanced uses of the dyne:bolic
+system: how to cluster multiple computers to take advantage of shared
+resources, how to make the system resident on various computers in a
+medialab and how to keep your data safe from intrusions into your
+privacy.</P
+><P
+>The knowledge provided by this chapter requires some basic confidence
+with GNU/Linux systems and the use of the text console terminal. It
+will empower you with the ability to flexibly setup fully operational
+medialabs even using found computers, but you need to plan well the
+architecture of your resources depending from your specific situation.</P
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN226"
+>Boot from harddisk</A
+></H2
+><P
+>&#13;With docking we saw that simply moving a directory in the root of a partition
+can let us boot from CD and run from harddisk. This is a very simple and safe
+way to have a dual-boot system: Cd in for dyne:bolic, CD out for anything else.
+Still some people really likes to get rid of the CD, so here it is explained how.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;Keep in mind that <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>the following operation is not necessary to run dyne:bolic from harddisk</I
+></SPAN
+>.
+If you are not familiar with boot sectors and partition geometry you might need the
+intervention of an expert when anything goes wrong. Furthermore, in case of a mistake you
+might delete all the data stored on your harddisks and/or be left without the possibility
+to boot back into your old operating system.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;In order to boot from harddisk you need a bootloader (Lilo or Grub) installed.
+We recommend the use of Grub for its simplicity and flexibility: in fact that
+is the default bootloader dyne:bolic will install for you, but in case you have
+Lilo already installed and you don't want to change it, then there is also a way
+to add a dyne:bolic entry to it.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;The following instructions will cover various situations: you can omit some operations
+in case your computer is already setted up with them.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>In case you are installing a computer from scratch</I
+></SPAN
+>, without
+anything installed on it yet, then you need to partition the harddisk and format it.
+You can do so using the command <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>cfdisk</I
+></SPAN
+> to create or
+modify your harddisk partitions, then <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>mke3fs</I
+></SPAN
+> to format the partitions
+(or other mk* commands in case you desire to use a different filesystem than Ext3).
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Beware that this operation above will erase all the data on the disk</I
+></SPAN
+>.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;Once you have a disc partitioned and formatted you need to install the bootloader.
+To do this use the command <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>grubconfig</I
+></SPAN
+> and follow the steps
+you are prompted, at the end of the process you will be able to boot your computer
+directly into dyne:bolic, without the need to use a CD.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>To re-configure your bootloader</I
+></SPAN
+> (not necessary if
+you installed one from scratch using dyne:bolic) go look into your harddisk
+partitions, in case you have a directory boot/ see if inside there is another
+directory called grub/, if yes there you found your grub configuration, a simple text file
+called grub.conf or menu.lst which you have to edit by hand, adding a
+few lines at the bottom in order to add dyne:bolic among the boot menu
+selection:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>title dyne:bolic RASTASOFT Afro Linux
+root (hd0,0) # ADJUST THIS!
+kernel /dyne/2618ck1d.krn root=/dev/ram0 rw load_ramdisk=1 max_loop=64 vga=791
+initrd /dyne/initrd.gz</KBD
+></PRE
+>
+
+After doing that you'll need to set the harddisk where you have
+docked: where it says "ADJUST THiS" change the
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>(hd0,0)</I
+></SPAN
+> if necessary: hd0,1 for hda2 - hd0,2 for
+hda3 - hd1,0 for hdb1 and so on... trying wrong values is not
+dangerous and in case you are confused there is a lot more
+documentation about this process in the grub manual pages.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;In case you have installed lilo, search among your harddisk partitions
+for the directory etc/ and then inside for the lilo.conf file, if
+found then add the following lines at the end of it:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>&#13;image = /dyne/2618ck1d.krn
+ root = /dev/ram0
+ append = "max_loop=64"
+ initrd = /dyne/initrd.gz
+ label = dyne
+ read-write
+ vga = 791&#13;</KBD
+></PRE
+>
+
+Being sure that the /dyne directory is inside the partition
+you boot, which in lilo is configured by the
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>boot = /dev/hd*</I
+></SPAN
+>
+usually at the beginning of the lilo.conf file.
+
+Please note the "image =" parameter takes a full path to
+the kernel file, which is named after it's version in a condensed form,
+for instance here 2618ck1d stands for 2.6.18-ck1-dyne .
+The condensed format is necessary for a 8.3 filename restriction of
+the isolinux CD boot system.</P
+><P
+> Happy hacking ;)</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN262"
+>Boot from network</A
+></H2
+><P
+>Network booting is supported on some personal computers: the PXE
+system was included on some BIOS already at the beginning of year 2000
+(rough estimation): if no harddisks or cd devices are found to boot,
+the first black screen of the computer will search for a PXE boot on
+the local network.</P
+><P
+>When booting PXE looks for a DHCP server on the local network for an
+address assigned. When found it will connect via TFTP to receive the
+kernel and the ramdisk from that server or another one.</P
+><P
+>To start a TFTP server distributing the current docked dyne:bolic system, it
+is enough to run this command in a terminal:
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>tftpd -l -s $DYNE_SYS_MNT</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+You can also configure a DHCP server to provide the network addresses
+to any PXE client booting. To do that use the graphical program
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>gdhcpd</I
+></SPAN
+> starting it from a terminal, or the sample
+configuration file in /etc/dhcpd.conf. See <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>man
+dhcpd</I
+></SPAN
+> for a reference to how to launch and operate the DHCP
+daemon.</P
+><P
+>For more informations see <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>man tftpd</I
+></SPAN
+> and
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>man dhcpd</I
+></SPAN
+>.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN279"
+>Boot from USB</A
+></H2
+><P
+>The following instructions explain how to make a usb storage device
+(like usb stick) bootable with grub and install dyne:bolic on it so
+that you can run it from USB, without harddisk or CD.</P
+><P
+>If you are looking for instructions on how to save your personal data
+on a USB stick, then this is not the right place: look
+at <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Nesting</I
+></SPAN
+>. If you're looking to copy the entire
+system over to your harddrive, again, this is not the right place,
+look at <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Docking</I
+></SPAN
+>. This section documents on how to
+put the whole system on the usb stick.</P
+><P
+>The whole system requires a USB device about the size of the /dyne
+directory (currently ~655MB at version 2.4.2) + ~30MB (for file system
+headers). Therefore, the entire system should fit on a USB stick of
+~685MB, but you may want a bit more space for your personal files. If
+your USB stick is smaller try Nesting instead.</P
+><P
+>How DyneII loads (technical):
+
+<P
+></P
+><TABLE
+BORDER="0"
+><TBODY
+><TR
+><TD
+>the boot system consists of a bootloader, in our case grub</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>the bootloader loads a kernel, in our case linux :)</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>the kernel loads a ramdisk, in our case dyne:II initrd.gz</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>the ramdisk will look for a dyne/ dock</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>we keep both kernel and ramdisk in a dock and install grub</TD
+></TR
+></TBODY
+></TABLE
+><P
+></P
+>
+
+First of all find what device your USB drive is
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>cat /proc/partitions</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+Ignore the entries that end in numbers, those are individual
+partitions on each separate device. The ones that end in letters are
+different devices: <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>hda</I
+></SPAN
+> means your primary IDE
+harddrive, <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>sda</I
+></SPAN
+> (or sdb sdc etc.) generally means
+a USB device (but can also mean a SCSI or SATA harddisk, be sure to
+verify this on your specific system configuration)</P
+><P
+>If you're confused, look at the blocks column, which shows the # of
+1KB blocks on the device. If you know how big your USB stick is, you
+can find it this way. ~1,000,000 blocks = a 1 gigabyte device; ~64,000
+blocks = 64MB device. From here on this tutorial assumes your usb
+device is <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>/dev/sda</I
+></SPAN
+>, if it's not /dev/sda, change
+it as necessary.</P
+><P
+>Now let's prepare the partitions of the usb key: in this example
+we are using the console based cfdisk here, but you can also try to
+use Parted which is a graphical tool in MENU-&#62;FILES-&#62;Parted. Be
+careful that you selected the right device to operate on (eventually
+different from the /dev/sda in the examples below) because from now on
+the operations described will erase all data on the device.</P
+><P
+>Let's start the partition tool:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>cfdisk /dev/sda</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+Now from inside cfdisk:
+
+<P
+></P
+><TABLE
+BORDER="0"
+><TBODY
+><TR
+><TD
+>delete all partitions</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>create a new primary at the default maximum size</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>set the type to 83 (Linux)</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>Write everything and then Quit</TD
+></TR
+></TBODY
+></TABLE
+><P
+></P
+>
+
+Now you are ready to format your drive:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>mke2fs /dev/sda1</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+You can change the above command <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>mke2fs -j</I
+></SPAN
+> in
+case you want to use EXT3 instead of EXT2. However, it is probably not
+advised to use the EXT3 journaled filesystem on a flash/USB device:
+journaling writes to the disk more often than necessary, which wears
+out the USB device more quickly. Use a non-journaled filesystem such
+as EXT2 (Linux only) or FAT32 (if you want to make your usb device
+readable outside of Linux). The default (ext2) is a safe choice,
+however, you may want to read up on journaled vs non-journaled file
+systems and make an informed decision in your case.</P
+><P
+>Now mount the drive:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/usb </KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+And Install the bootloader (grub):
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>grubconfig</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+Select the correct usb device, generally the last item in the
+list. Note that if all the items in the list start
+with <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>hda</I
+></SPAN
+> the computer you're currently using can't
+be booted from a usb device and you'd be installing grub to a
+partition of your harddrive instead.</P
+><P
+>Now copy the dyne/ dock directory from your current system
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>mkdir /mnt/usb/dyne</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+>
+<SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>rsync --inplace -Pr $DYNE_SYS_MNT/* /mnt/usb/dyne/</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+Rsync is better than cp and we have a progressbar for this operation,
+which will take quite some time, depending if you have a USB 1.0 or
+2.0 connection.</P
+><P
+>It should be all ready at this point, so try booting your USB device
+on a computer which supports USB booting. If it works, great! If not,
+open your /boot/grub/menu.lst (on the USB device) and change the
+root(...) line from (hd0,0) to (hd1,0).</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN343"
+>Cluster computer farms</A
+></H2
+><P
+>Since version 2, dyne:bolic changes its approach to clustering
+implementing a "human driven" suite of tools that let you control
+various applications running on multiple computers connected to
+your network.</P
+><P
+>In situations where you have many old computers you can use one for
+each task and control all of them from the same keyboard and mouse.
+The desktops of the computers can be visualized on your own screen or
+on multiple screens in case you have monitors attached to each of
+them. Powerful workstations can be combined using multiple processing
+units and their displays can be tiled together to compose a unique
+wide desktop.</P
+><P
+>This way to operate dyne:bolic computers involves different kinds of
+applications offering a flexible setup that you can customize to your
+needs. This part of the manual will just make you familiar with the
+tools and you'll need to refer to their manuals to discover all the
+potential.</P
+><P
+>To connect multiple computers you should first make sure you can reach
+them over the network and you know their addresses. A simple way to do
+it that will work on every GNU/Linux system is using the
+command <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>ifconfig</I
+></SPAN
+> on each computer to print out
+the currently configured network address:
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>ifconfig | grep inet</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+then edit your <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>/etc/hosts</I
+></SPAN
+> file with the full list
+of addresses and a name for them that you can choose. Copying the /etc/hosts file on all involved machines will make them aware of each other "hostnames".</P
+><P
+><SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Synergy</I
+></SPAN
+> is a powerful tool that lets your
+keyboard and mouse control different desktops accessed simply moving
+the mouse out of the current screen into theirs. An example
+configuration file is provided
+in <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>/etc/synergy.conf</I
+></SPAN
+> and it must be modified
+with the hostnames of your computers (to be associated to IP numeric
+addresses in /etc/hosts).
+&#13;</P
+><P
+>The main computer where the keyboard and mouse are attached should run
+the command:
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>synergys -n hostname -c /etc/synergy.conf</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+All the other computers to be connected should run this command,
+making sure the config file include them in the setup:
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>synergyc -n hostname -c /etc/synergy.conf</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+></P
+><P
+><SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>VNC</I
+></SPAN
+> is a remote video client that lets you
+control the desktop of another computer on your network as inside a
+window on your current desktop. It can be also used to interact with
+two mouse and keyboard at the same time.</P
+><P
+>To share the desktop of a computer for an incoming VNC connection just
+run:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>x11vnc</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+To connect to a computer sharing the VNC desktop:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>vncviewer computer</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+For more informations on VNC see <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>man x11vnc</I
+></SPAN
+> and
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>man vncviewer</I
+></SPAN
+>.</P
+><P
+><SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Remote X</I
+></SPAN
+> execution lets you run an application on
+another computer and control it on your desktop, as if it would be
+running locally.</P
+><P
+>In order to authorize other computers to open applications on your
+desktop you must first run the command:
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>xhost +computer</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+Then Click the network button on the top-right panel and
+run <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Exec_X11</I
+></SPAN
+>, fill in your user account (default
+is user:root password:luther) and write the command to start the application.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN394"
+>Keep your data safe</A
+></H2
+><P
+>Dyne:bolic is developed with your privacy in mind: as mentioned before
+the NEST can be encrypted to make your private data unaccessible
+unless your password is provided, now we'll proceed to analize in deep
+all the aspects of this security measure.</P
+><P
+>When an encrypted nest is created, every file you place in your home
+directory will be preserved in a scrambled form using a
+Rijndael/SHA256 algorithm: such a cypher can be considered very
+secure, maybe some military organizations are able to break it, but
+anyway that would be very expensive in terms of resources employed.</P
+><P
+>Dyne:bolic encryption mechanism employes a passfile "dyne.nst.gpg"
+which contains the cypher used to protect your data: that file holds
+the password that, matched together with your dyne.nst file, can
+access all the data you store in your nest. So actually that file is
+very precious for your privacy, you should be careful and not copy it
+around.</P
+><P
+>Since the passfile is so delicate, it is also protected with a
+password: the one you choose at the beginning, which is used to
+scramble the passfile through a CAT5 algorithm. Keep in mind that this
+cypher algorithm is weak and eventually, in case an intruder takes
+possession of your .gpg passfile, it will be easy to crack.</P
+><P
+>Now in practical terms all this encryption scheme means that you can
+safely move around your dyne.nst file separated from the dyne.nst.gpg
+passfile: there will be no intrusion in the data stored inside even in
+case you loose it. It also means that you can give your passfile to a
+friend, still protected by the password you memorized, so that neither
+you nor your friend will be able to access the nest until you meet up
+again. More in general, this scheme lets you separate your encrypted
+data from the passfile, still keeping everything sealed by the
+password you keep in mind, and move the data around in different
+places being sure meanwhile it's not accessed by anyone else.</P
+><P
+>So for sure we can say our privacy protection is way above the usual
+schemes used in most common operating systems, which keep your data in
+clear and physically accessible.
+ </P
+><P
+>In case you are involved in some mission critical task and you are
+facing the possibility of imprisonment and torture, you should take a
+bit more care. A good practice would be to customize a bit the startup
+scripts of dyne:bolic to have a false password prompt, the
+/lib/dyne/nest.sh script is a good start. Another way can be to have
+an encrypted nest for which you would disclose the password if forced
+to, but then also another encrypted file hidden somewhere that is not
+prompting for a password at every boot.</P
+></DIV
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="CHAPTER"
+><HR><H1
+><A
+NAME="AEN403"
+></A
+>Chapter 4. Video production</H1
+><H2
+>Play, record, edit and stream your video</H2
+><FONT
+COLOR="RED"
+>Play, record, edit and stream your video</FONT
+><P
+>&#13;The GNU/Linux platform nowadays offers an interesting range of tools
+for video production, editing and manipulation; you can play all kind
+of video files and DVDs, but also encode them for distribution and
+switch between formats. Furthermore, you'll find software for
+recording, veejaying and streaming, non-linear editing and subtitling.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;However, you should consider that most of the video tools running on
+GNU/Linux platform are in development: indeed you can help much in
+testing and reporting the bugs you encounter, that's how anyone can
+help free software to grow better and better, as it does.&#13;</P
+><P
+>Now lets proceed on how to configure an available video device and then
+browse thru the video software included in dyne:bolic,
+following a subdivision in task categories.</P
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN411"
+>Configure your video devices</A
+></H2
+><P
+>There are various devices that can be used on PC computers in order to
+have video input: USB webcams and capture cards, PCI TV cards,
+Firewire and even parallel port. They all have different chipsets and
+manufacturers and need different Linux device drivers.</P
+><P
+>&#13;Dyne:bolic is capable to automaticly recognize most PCI (internal) TV
+cards at boot time (WinTV, BTTV) and now also USB webcams as well
+Firewire controllers: they will all be initialized at boot and can be
+accessed from the video device <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>/dev/video0</I
+></SPAN
+> or
+subsequent numbers (video1, video2 ..) in case you have more than one.</P
+><P
+>&#13;If your video device is not recognized automatically (the /dev/video
+doesn't exists) then you need to configure it by hand. In case of USB
+webcams, if your is not recognized automatically a good place to look
+for hints is <A
+HREF="http://www.linux-usb.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>the linux-usb
+website</A
+>.
+
+Also the <A
+HREF="http://spot.river-styx.com/viewarticle.php?id=16"
+TARGET="_top"
+> Spot's guide
+about rolling your camera </A
+> is a good place to visit for more
+informations on how to proceed.</P
+><P
+>&#13; If the online documentation says your device is supported by a
+particular kernel driver, you can try to load it using the command
+'<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>modprobe modulename</I
+></SPAN
+>' and see if everything went
+well by looking in the last lines of the messages printed out by the
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>dmesg</I
+></SPAN
+> command.
+
+Many modules are already present in dyne:bolic, but some might require
+to be compiled using the kernel sources, which is a more complicated
+process that can't be explained here: you'll need to find more
+instructions online about how to do it and download the dyne:II kernel
+sources using <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>dyneSDK</I
+></SPAN
+> (see the DEVELOPMENT
+chapter about it).&#13;</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN426"
+>VeeJay</A
+></H2
+><P
+>&#13;The VeeJay applications implement a pioneeristical approach to video
+manipulation in realtime, taking advantage of the high computational
+power offered by personal computers nowadays. If you're active in the
+field of media and visual art, dance or scenografy, this software can
+be interesting and sometimes very useful to your research.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;&#13;</P
+><P
+><A
+HREF="http://freej.dyne.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>FreeJ</A
+> is a vision mixer: an
+instrument for realtime video manipulation used in the fields of dance
+teather, veejaying, medical visualisation and TV.</P
+><P
+>FreeJ lets you interact with multiple layers of video, filtered by
+effect chains and then mixed together. Controllers can be scripted for
+keyboard, midi and joysticks, to manipulate images, movies, live
+cameras, particle generators, text scrollers, flash animations and
+more. All the resulting video mix can be shown on multiple and remote
+screens, encoded into a movie and streamed live to the internet.</P
+><P
+>FreeJ can be controlled locally or remotely, also from multiple places
+at the same time, using its slick console interface; can be automated
+via javascript and operated via MIDI and Joystick. Especially the
+javascript interpreted makes it an easy to learn language to make your
+first step in the wornderful world of programming.</P
+><P
+>More documentation on freej can be found
+in <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>/opt/video/share/freej</I
+></SPAN
+> especially the
+scripting
+reference. A <A
+HREF="http://lab.dyne.org/FreejTutorialPiotr_01"
+TARGET="_top"
+>user
+friendly tutorial</A
+> can be found online, and more information at
+its homepage
+on <A
+HREF="http://freej.dyne.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>freej.dyne.org</A
+>.</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+Other tools included in dyne:bolic are useful to be employed in
+different ways on realtime video: <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>EffecTV</I
+></SPAN
+> can
+apply realtime effects to images, one by one, realizing "distortion
+
+
+
+mirrors" and other possible funny uses; <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Xaos</I
+></SPAN
+> can
+let you explore the psychedelical word of chaos mathematics and
+fractals :)&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+A remarkable piece of software is <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Pure Data</I
+></SPAN
+> which
+together with various extensions realizes a tool to connect various
+processing units in a visual scripting fashion, to create visionary
+audio machines and interactive video tools.
+
+Pure Data, also called PD, is as powerful as complicated to learn; it
+helps the fact that is getting now adopted by various media-art
+schools around the world as a free and open source for students to
+realize their projects.
+
+From the wide community of digital artists and creatives using it in
+all kinds of interactive installations and performances, the Goto10
+crew joined the development of dyne:II to implement the
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>pure.dyne</I
+></SPAN
+> software module which provides you
+everything you need to start using Pure Data right out of the box,
+without installation problems: check their website at <A
+HREF="http://puredyne.goto10.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>http://puredyne.goto10.org</A
+> to
+download a copy and add it to your dyne:bolic system.&#13;</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN457"
+>Play</A
+></H2
+><P
+>Players are provided to playback various video formats as AVI, MPEG,
+DIVX and WMV files, signals from TV cards or Quicktime, RTSP and HTTP
+live streams from the net. At the time being, dyne:bolic is
+compatible with most of the video formats around: thanks to
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>MPlayer</I
+></SPAN
+>, <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Xine</I
+></SPAN
+> and
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>FFMpeg</I
+></SPAN
+> free software you have chances to view
+files otherwise unsupported by other proprietary systems.
+
+Xine is recommended for watching DVDs, while Xawtv is a fully featured
+television viewer. Mplayer will be used to playback videofiles
+whenever you'll doubleclick one in the file manager (to close mplayer
+then you have to press 'q').&#13;</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN472"
+>Record</A
+></H2
+><P
+>&#13;Video recording is supported using a vast number of devices: from
+TV/video card and DVD using <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>MEncoder</I
+></SPAN
+>, a
+commandline tool to be used from an XTerminal, a bit complicated but
+very powerful, see it's manual. An user-friendly interface for DV
+
+
+
+acquisition via firewire is provided by <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Kino</I
+></SPAN
+>;
+
+
+
+while <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>XawTV</I
+></SPAN
+> supports all other types of video
+devices and can be good to check if your is recognized as it has the
+widest support for hardware.&#13;</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN487"
+>Edit</A
+></H2
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+Inside dyne:bolic you'll find <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Cinelerra</I
+></SPAN
+>, which
+implements a common approach to non-linear editing, with a nice user
+interface, speed and responsiveness.&#13;</P
+><P
+>You can be introduced to <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Cinelerra</I
+></SPAN
+> by the manual
+available
+on <A
+HREF="http://manual.cinelerra.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>manual.cinelerra.org</A
+>
+or
+this <A
+HREF="http://www.robfisher.net/video/cinelerra1.html"
+TARGET="_top"
+>online
+tutorial</A
+>.</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+Also <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>AviDeMux</I
+></SPAN
+> is a useful tool for quickly
+cutting video, supports even more input formats than Cinelerra and can
+be used to convert between some formats and do simple editing tasks.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;Consider that video editing tasks are the most demanding, so you'll
+need a relatively fast computer (from 2004-2005) in order to achieve
+decent interactivity and satisfactory results.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+For converting between video formats its included the powerful
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Transcode</I
+></SPAN
+> tool, which is a commandline application
+that can be scripted to convert large number of files or easily accessed
+via a graphical interface.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN509"
+>Stream</A
+></H2
+><P
+>&#13;Streaming video can be easily setted up in three different ways: using
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Mpeg4IP</I
+></SPAN
+>, <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>FreeJ</I
+></SPAN
+> or
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>HasciiCam</I
+></SPAN
+>.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+With <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Mpeg4IP</I
+></SPAN
+> you'll stream in Mpeg4 format and
+you'll need an online server running Darwin broadcast software, the
+resulting stream can be watched with most video players available
+today on various platform. This method provides good quality and
+smooth framerate, can record while streaming, efficiently uses
+bandwidth when running on multicast and can stream audio synced with
+the video. It's drawbacks are that it can be hard to find or setup a
+broadcast server, slower machines can't stream neither play it (cpu
+intensive).&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+With <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>FreeJ</I
+></SPAN
+> you can combine different video
+sources, apply effects and overlay text, put transparent images and
+even more, then all the resulting stream can be live encoded with the
+free Theora codec and sent to an Icecast2 server online, this way
+anyone will be able to take your stream from the internet and play it
+back for example using
+the <A
+HREF="http://www.videolan.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>VideoLan</A
+> player
+available for all computer platforms. The capability of mixing and
+effecting the video realtime is a unique feature of FreeJ, but the
+drawback can be the initial difficulty you can encounter in mastering
+the program, which has to be started with particular flags from an
+XTerminal in order to activate the streaming functionality. To find
+out more about it see the previous section about VeeJaying and check
+the <A
+HREF="http://lab.dyne.org/FreejStreaming"
+TARGET="_top"
+>Streaming with
+FreeJ</A
+> documentation online. In dyne:bolic you will find an
+example script to stream
+in <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>/opt/video/share/freej</I
+></SPAN
+>&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Hasciicam</I
+></SPAN
+> is Rasta software, the first one
+Jaromil ever published (2000), distributed by dyne.org. It is capable
+of rendering a video into text, having letters in place of colors,
+filling up the image as a greyscale palette. With such an encoding the
+images look way less detailed, but pretty cool, and the stream uses
+very low bandwidth: Hasciicam can upload video via ftp to a server and
+can be viewed directly from any web browser (also text based) - so it
+can work to provide a video stream even using very old computers, and
+adds a special bit to it: the ASCII chars. As drawbacks here we have
+that the video is formed of characters: nifty, but doesn't gives a
+clear picture, it is just monochrome and can't achieve a smooth
+framerate on movement. For more informations on how to use
+see <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>man hasciicam</I
+></SPAN
+>.&#13;</P
+></DIV
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="CHAPTER"
+><HR><H1
+><A
+NAME="AEN534"
+></A
+>Chapter 5. Audio production</H1
+><H2
+>Play, record edit and stream your audio</H2
+><FONT
+COLOR="RED"
+>Play, record edit and stream your audio</FONT
+><P
+>This distribution is full with audio software to do all kind of things:
+electronic music, sound processing, voice effects, interviews and more.
+And there is one important thing that makes this system superior to any
+other commercial solution: there is no competition :)</P
+><P
+>Most of the audio applications in dyne:bolic can be connected together,
+input to output, in order to form a chain of tools processing the sound:
+this is done thanks to a technologies like JACK and the Advanced Linux
+Sound Architecture. Instead of keeping separated the tasks of every
+single application, now it is possible to take advantage of the great
+variety of approaches that a GNU/Linux system like dyne:bolic has to
+offer.</P
+><P
+>This revolutionary approach will surely pay you back the effort to
+be introduced to its use, a good starting point is the Spot perspective
+on technology at <A
+HREF="http://spot.river-styx.com/viewarticle.php?id=14"
+TARGET="_top"
+>http://spot.river-styx.com/viewarticle.php?id=14</A
+>
+and <A
+HREF="http://spot.river-styx.com/viewarticle.php?id=17"
+TARGET="_top"
+>http://spot.river-styx.com/viewarticle.php?id=17</A
+>.</P
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN544"
+>Play</A
+></H2
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+This operating systems provides players for many audio formats
+available around out of the box: WAV, MIDI, MP3, OGG / VORBIS, MOD, XM, FLAC, SPEEX
+and even more can be played out or re-encoded, switching between formats.</P
+><P
+>
+
+
+The <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Xmms</I
+></SPAN
+> player is a practical audio player with
+a minimal and intuitive playlist manager, can play online radio
+streams and local files and can be skinned or customized with plugins
+as you like.&#13;</P
+><P
+>
+
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Amarok</I
+></SPAN
+> is a fully featured personal jukebox,
+handling the collection of your audio and downloading automatically
+printable lables and lyrics of your favourite music. Let it explore
+your collection of audio so that it will let you search for keywords,
+memorize your preferences and guess playlists out of your favourite
+music. It makes it a perfect interface for a jukebox station!&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Timidity</I
+></SPAN
+> is a midi synthetizers using GUS patches
+to render your MIDI files into audio files, as well make you listen to
+MIDI partitures.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>MikMod</I
+></SPAN
+> is a tracker module player (file
+extensions as MOD, XM, S3M etc.) which can let you listen to
+demo-scene prods, video game music and what's commony called "chip
+tunes".&#13;</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN570"
+>Perform</A
+></H2
+><P
+>&#13;This section includes software to produce live music, interacting in
+realtime with the applications that generate sound out of microphone,
+midi, keyboard and mouse inputs. All this software requires Jack to
+work properly, so that it can be interconnected in a chain of
+programs, like a virtual rack of different applications.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Hydrogen</I
+></SPAN
+> is a drum-machine where you can load
+sample kits of instruments and compose a partiture for them to play on
+a specific rythm. It's homepage offers a collection of many more drum
+kits you can download, go to <A
+HREF="http://www.hydrogen-music.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>http://www.hydrogen-music.org</A
+>.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Jamin</I
+></SPAN
+> is the Jack audio mastering interface, it
+can perform professional audio mastering of stereo input streams,
+equalizing signals with an intuitive and advanced interface to shape
+all frequencies in realtime.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Jack Rack</I
+></SPAN
+> is a powerful effect rack that can
+apply chains of audio plugins (LADSPA) on the sound currently being
+played by other programs. Using Jack you can interface it with all
+other performance tools and add one of the more than 200 effects
+available in dyne:bolic.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>FreeWheeling</I
+></SPAN
+> is a funky application that lets you
+record and play multiple samples in realtime, so that they stay
+looping and can be overlayed one after the other: is a fresh tool to
+manipulate, sum and and create over recorded sounds, but requires you
+to read some instructions before start using it, since it's all
+controlled via keyboard (and, optionally, midi).&#13;</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN594"
+>Record and edit</A
+></H2
+><P
+>&#13;This version of dyne:bolic comes with up to date software to record
+and manipulate audio: it is generally more stable and feature rich
+than the previous, so you'll hopefully notice the improvements while
+using it.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Ardour</I
+></SPAN
+> is the fully featured multitrack studio
+that offers the most advanced interface for your music recording
+studio. Combined together with other applications when necessary (it
+also uses Jack) it can really solve all your needs for audio mastering
+and music production. Check the online documentation for this valuable
+software on <A
+HREF="http://www.ardour.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>Ardour
+homepage</A
+>: if you are a musician, the patience needed to learn
+it's usage and hotkeys is definitely worth the effort.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Audacity</I
+></SPAN
+> is a user-friendly audio editing program
+suitable to manipulate your audio files, interviews and recordings,
+separating or mixing them, applying effects and encoding in various
+formats. It can also be used to record audio straight away via its
+intuitive interface, which can be commonly found also on other
+operating systems since it is a cross-platform free application.
+A perfect choice to start manipulating audio.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Rezound</I
+></SPAN
+> is a well capable sample editor that lets
+you manipulate with good precision your music samples, record, loop
+and apply effects using an intuitive and complete interface, quite
+responsive also on slower systems.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>TimeMachine</I
+></SPAN
+> is a simple yet very useful tool for
+recording audio, requiring Jack as a sound engine. It is simply a big
+red button: when you press it it will start recording starting from 10
+seconds ago, so that you can record what you find interesting in an
+audio input just while listening. Whenever you press it records what
+you just listened, without the need to rewind the tape.&#13;</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN618"
+>Stream</A
+></H2
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>MuSE</I
+></SPAN
+> is another rasta soft by dyne.org included,
+which lets you stream audio on the internet over various servers
+(Icecast, Darwin and Shoutcast) in MP3 or OGG format, so that
+listeners will be able to listen to your voice and music connecting
+with most available sound players around. &#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;MuSE can mix up to 6 encoded audio bitstreams (from files or network,
+mp3 or ogg) plus a souncard input signal, the resulting stream can be
+played locally on the sound card and/or encoded at different bitrates,
+recorded to harddisk and/or streamed to the net.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+A great introduction to streaming and how to operate muse is available
+online on <A
+HREF="http://flossmanuals.org/muse"
+TARGET="_top"
+>http://flossmanuals.org/muse</A
+>, while
+even more documentation can be found on <A
+HREF="http://muse.dyne.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>its website</A
+>.&#13;</P
+></DIV
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="CHAPTER"
+><HR><H1
+><A
+NAME="AEN632"
+></A
+>Chapter 6. Graphical software</H1
+><H2
+>Image manipulation and 3d modeling</H2
+><FONT
+COLOR="RED"
+>Image manipulation and 3d modeling</FONT
+><P
+>The dyne:bolic distribution includes some eccellent programs
+for image composition and 3d modeling:</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Gimp</I
+></SPAN
+> is a well mature application capable to
+create and edit bitmap images, offers a perfect environment for
+web graphics as well a powerful script engine to automatize its
+operations and even generate automatically stylish logos.</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Inkscape</I
+></SPAN
+> is a vectorial graphics editor suitable
+for free hand drawing, cartoons and comics and more generally scalable
+graphics, realizing an ideal tool for flyers, high resolution prints
+and quadri-chromic prints&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Blender</I
+></SPAN
+> consists of a powerful environment for
+3d modeling and game development: it features a well designed
+interface, a ray tracing engine and scriptability of object behaviours
+in python: it can produce rendered scenes as well interactive applications
+and animations on timelines.
+There is allready a great comunity of artists using it, tutorial and
+examples are available on its website, as well a detailed manual that
+can be ordered online. Blender is one of the best tools in the open source
+and free software world for multimedia productions of many kinds, being
+adopted in the production of several professional movies.
+Using the clustering capability of dyne:bolic you can easily build render
+farms distributing the load on several computers on the same network, see
+the Spot's tutorial available online on <A
+HREF="http://"
+TARGET="_top"
+>http://</A
+>.</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>GQview</I
+></SPAN
+> is an easy to use image browser which you can
+also use to build slideshows to interactively show your image galleries.</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>ImageMagick</I
+></SPAN
+> is a set of commandline tools, starting
+from the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>convert</I
+></SPAN
+> terminal command
+(see <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>man convert</I
+></SPAN
+>) you can easily script batch operations
+over multiple files, applying format conversion and filters on large
+quantities of images.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="CHAPTER"
+><HR><H1
+><A
+NAME="AEN664"
+></A
+>Chapter 7. Text software</H1
+><H2
+>Text editing and publishing with dyne:bolic</H2
+><FONT
+COLOR="RED"
+>Text editing and publishing with dyne:bolic</FONT
+><P
+>&#13;Dyne:bolic includes software to let you easily write and compose
+any kind of text document: hyper-texts that can be published on
+the internet (HTML), formatted texts that can be printed (RTF,
+PDF, Postscript and even the deprecated DOC
+
+<A
+NAME="AEN670"
+HREF="#FTN.AEN670"
+><SPAN
+CLASS="footnote"
+>[2]</SPAN
+></A
+>
+
+format).</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+AbiWord is rapidly becoming a state of the art Word Processor, with
+lots of features useful for your daily work, personal needs, or for
+just some good old typing fun. It is able to read and write all
+industry standard document types, such as OpenOffice.org documents,
+Microsoft Word documents, WordPerfect documents, Rich Text Format
+documents, HTML web pages and many more.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Scribus</I
+></SPAN
+> is a desktop publishing program to
+compose vectorial formats like PDF and Postscript, it is useful
+to paginate text in a professional printable form to produce
+magazines, flyers and most publications that need to mix text and
+images in pages following customizable schemes.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Nedit</I
+></SPAN
+> is a plain text editor providing syntax
+highlight for a couple of sourcecode languages, it is intuitive and
+easy to use for the newbies, but at the same can offer a powerful
+environment for programmers.</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+At last, <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Antiword</I
+></SPAN
+> is a very handy commandline
+application to convert with a simple command any .doc file into a
+plain text file, keeping the alignement of the lines intact.
+For a quick start try it out:
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ #</SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>antiword evil.doc &#62; good.txt</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+as usual there are manual pages providing more informations on its usage,
+just type <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>man antiword</I
+></SPAN
+> into a terminal.</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+In case you need a full blown office suite to satisfy your needs here,
+there is an <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Open Office 2.0</I
+></SPAN
+> dyne module available
+online for download from our website, you can place it into your Dock
+modules directory ( dyne/modules/ ) and at next reboot you'll find it
+in the application menu. With Open Office you can read and write all
+.DOC files, .XLS spreadsheets, .PPT presentations and more.&#13;</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="CHAPTER"
+><HR><H1
+><A
+NAME="AEN704"
+></A
+>Chapter 8. Communication software</H1
+><H2
+>Communication software included in dyne:bolic</H2
+><FONT
+COLOR="RED"
+>Communication software included in dyne:bolic</FONT
+><P
+>Since their birth, UNIX systems have been specially enhanced for
+network tasks, to efficiently handle communication protocols connecting
+computers across the net and of course the Internet.
+Being a GNU/Linux system, dyne:bolic offers a vast range of possibilities
+and applications, from the simpliest to the most advanced network software.</P
+><P
+>As a practical tool for media hacktivism, dyne:bolic emphasizes on
+protecting the privacy of the users, providing an anonymizing proxy
+and email encryption tools ready for use.</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+The <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Samba</I
+></SPAN
+> filesharing daemon runs by default on
+dyne:bolic, sharing in read-only the currently running system on the
+local network to make it available for network installing. If you want
+to share other directories you'll need to tweak by hand the
+configuration file in <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>/etc/samba</I
+></SPAN
+> </P
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN717"
+>Surf the web</A
+></H2
+><FONT
+COLOR="RED"
+>software to access the world wide web</FONT
+><P
+>&#13;There are three different ways to access the WWW pages on the net using
+dyne:bolic, thanks to the variety of web browsers developed for the
+GNU/Linux platform.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+The first and most familiar browser is <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Firefox</I
+></SPAN
+> which
+is developed by the Mozilla team in order to have a fully capable tool to
+access the web. Firefox offers an intuitive interface, bookmark handling
+and a couple of plugins that can be used to extend its functionalities.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+Then we have <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Links</I
+></SPAN
+> which is a lightweight alternative
+to the previous: it runs much faster on old computers while still offering
+most of the crucial functionalities. It is remarkable its quality and speed
+in rendering web pages, making it a great tool for presentations.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+In order to edit webpages, <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Nvu</I
+></SPAN
+> is provided for
+web designers, which provides a powerful WYSIWYG environment that is
+fully integrated with the Firefox/Mozilla standards of webpages. It is
+a user-friendly tool that you'll find available also for many other
+platforms and operating systems, so it's worth a little effort to
+learn how to use it, then you can have your homepage ready in minutes.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+A powerful "spider" is also included to crawl and download entire
+websites: <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>WGet</I
+></SPAN
+>, which is a commandline tool. As
+usual you can discover how it works by consulting its manual from an
+XTerminal, typing <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>man wget</I
+></SPAN
+>.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;
+
+
+
+For better privacy and anomymity when browsing, but also to weed out
+often annoying advertisements and popups, a proxy can be configured to
+run by default: <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Tor</I
+></SPAN
+> can be configured for use in
+each browser to make all internet connections completely anonymous and
+not traceable.</P
+><P
+>To enable this feature have a look at
+the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>dyne.cfg</I
+></SPAN
+> in your DOCK and add "tor" in the
+list of daemons to be started at boot.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN752"
+>Email and encryption</A
+></H2
+><FONT
+COLOR="RED"
+>Send your letters in a safe way</FONT
+><P
+>Email is nowadays the most widespread technology used for personal
+communication on the net. Alltough it is often not secured for privacy
+and it is being easily intercepted by all kind of third parties:
+to enforce governmental control, market surveys and spionage.
+If you are concerned about privacy then you probably allready heard
+about the solution to secure email communication:
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>encryption</I
+></SPAN
+>.</P
+><P
+>Encryption is a technique based on mathematical formulas, it can ensure
+security in your communication by using two keys: a private and a public
+one, you will give the public to your friends while keep the private one to
+decypher the messages you receive - everyone wanting to send you a secure
+message will need to use your public key to encrypt it and only your private
+key will be able to decrypt it.
+For more information on its usage and implementation refer to the web pages
+on <A
+HREF="http://www.gnupg.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>http://www.gnupg.org</A
+></P
+><P
+>&#13;Dyne:bolic comes equipped with a popular email program:
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Thunderbird</I
+></SPAN
+> which can handle local downloading of
+mailbox, filters, folders and multiple accounts. It can be integrated
+with the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>GnuPG encryption</I
+></SPAN
+> system installing a
+plugin extension called <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Enigmail</I
+></SPAN
+>.&#13;</P
+><P
+>Also included is <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>GPA</I
+></SPAN
+> the GNU Privacy Assistant which
+will help you in the task of generating your encryption keys and handling
+the collection of your friends keys into a local keyring.</P
+></DIV
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="CHAPTER"
+><HR><H1
+><A
+NAME="AEN780"
+></A
+>Chapter 9. Command line console</H1
+><P
+>If you really want a fast way to work on your computer to change
+configurations, install software, or work remotely on another
+computer, then the command line is the most efficient way to do it.
+Many people get scared of the command line interface (CLI) as they are
+used to using graphical user interfaces (GUI). If you haven't used a
+CLI before it can be a bit daunting but actually, with practice you
+may very well find it easier and come to prefer it over using a GUI.</P
+><P
+>The only key really is to take it slowly, and practice what you have
+learnt. Don't try and remember everything, just use it what you know
+and extend it as necessary. It will all come with time.</P
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN788"
+>Text commands</A
+></H2
+><P
+>The command line is the most powerful method of interacting with
+Linux, however if you are not used to it the learning path can be
+steep. The best strategy is just to start using some basic
+commands. Don't attempt to do all your work from the command line
+straight away. Learn a few commands, use them and add to your
+understanding of what they can do over time. Then you can slowly
+extend your vocabulary of commands as you need to. Below are some
+basic commands that you could try starting with.</P
+><P
+>&#13;Don't try and learn all of them at once. Just choose a few and practice
+them.
+
+<P
+></P
+><TABLE
+BORDER="0"
+><TBODY
+><TR
+><TD
+>man</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>ls</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>cd</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>mkdir</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>mv</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>rm</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>locate / slocate</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>ping</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>cp</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>pwd</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>tab</TD
+></TR
+></TBODY
+></TABLE
+><P
+></P
+>
+
+And some others that would be good to know:
+
+<P
+></P
+><TABLE
+BORDER="0"
+><TBODY
+><TR
+><TD
+>ldconfig</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>./configure</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>make</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>make install</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>tar</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>more</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>whereis</TD
+></TR
+></TBODY
+></TABLE
+><P
+></P
+>&#13;</P
+><P
+>So, lets have a look at each. Feel free to experiment with these
+commands. Be a little careful as it is possible to do some damage to
+your files, folder,s and even the operating system if you are too
+casual. If there is a possibility one of the commands can accidentally
+create havoc then I will make a note to warn you. So try some of these
+out in a terminal.</P
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN815"
+>man</A
+></H3
+><P
+>This is a good command to start with because this accesses the buult
+in help pages for Linux. <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>man</I
+></SPAN
+> is short for
+'manual' and if you type this command followed by a space, and then
+the name of another command you will get a help page displayed in the
+terminal with a description for that command. For example, typing:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>man ls</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+The above will give you a terminal window filled with information
+about the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>ls</I
+></SPAN
+> command. The format of this help
+page might be a bit confusing, so just have a browse and don't get too
+worried. The part you need to be interested in most is the description
+of the command (i.e., what it does). To scroll down the manual page
+press your space bar, and to quit the man page press
+the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>q</I
+></SPAN
+> key.</P
+><P
+>Try some man commands and then read about the other commands I have
+listed above. There is also another help system that works the same
+way, but instead of typing man you type <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>info</I
+></SPAN
+>
+and the command like so:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>info ls</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+Experiment!</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN835"
+>ls</A
+></H3
+><P
+>The <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>ls</I
+></SPAN
+> command is the 'list' command. You can use
+this to list the contents of any directory you are in. Try typing this
+command in a terminal window and see what you get. Now, one feature of
+Linux commands is that you can add various parameters to them. This is
+quite a simple thing to do, and refines the way you use the
+command. Usually these parameters are added to the command by typing a
+' - ' directly after the command and then the parameter names or
+abbreviations. For example if I type the following:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>ls -l</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+Then I am /passing/ the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>l</I
+></SPAN
+> parameter to
+the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>ls</I
+></SPAN
+> c||ommand. The l parameter is short for
+'long list' and refers to a type of format that the ls information
+should be displayed in. This format gives more information than just
+typing the ls command by itself... Try the two out and compare the
+difference.</P
+><P
+>You might well ask 'how do I know what the parameters are for each
+command?' This information can be found in the man pages for each
+command and accessing these is easy (see above).</P
+><P
+>For the ls command I suggest you get familiar with the formats using
+ls by itself, as well as ls -al, ls -l and ls -lh.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN850"
+>cd</A
+></H3
+><P
+><SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>cd</I
+></SPAN
+> is the most common command used to navigate
+the file-system on your computer. cd stands for <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Change
+Directory</I
+></SPAN
+>. Try it out by typing ls to get a list of all the
+files and folders in the directory you are currently in. Now try
+typing ls followed by the name of one of the files in the list, for
+example if there was a file called 'me.txt' I could type:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>cd me.txt</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+This will give an error! Why? Because you can't change to a directory
+if it is a file. It's good to try this so that you understand that you
+can't do any damage by making a mistake with cd. To change to a
+directory you type cd followed by the name of a directory you want to
+navigate to. If there was a directory called 'src' listed when we
+tried the ls command, we would type:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>cd src</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+If that was successful then the terminal won't throw up an error. Try
+it with a real directory on your computer. If you fail it will be
+because either you don't have permissions to enter the directory, you
+misspelled the directory name, or the directory simply doesn't exist.</P
+><P
+>Now, a word about the Linux file-system. Generally, if the system has
+been set up nicely for you, you will be working in your <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>home
+directory</I
+></SPAN
+>. This is normally located in a set place in
+Linux. To find your home directory first type the following:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>cd /</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+This will place you in the top directory on your computer's file-system.</P
+><P
+>If you now type ls this will show the list of directories on your
+computer at the top-most level of the file structure.</P
+><P
+>There are some important directories here, the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>man
+hier</I
+></SPAN
+> command will give you an overview and description of
+their meaning; but now you need to be most concerned with the one
+named <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>home</I
+></SPAN
+>. To change to this directory we can
+use the cd command we learned earlier:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>cd home</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+Now if you type ls you will be shown a list of more directories, and
+hopefully one that is the same as your username. This is your /home/
+directory. Now, we have been navigating to this
+using <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>relative positioning</I
+></SPAN
+>, that is -- if I am in
+the top directory and I type 'cd home' then I will be placed in the
+home directory where all the user's individual home directories are
+kept.</P
+><P
+>If I was somewhere else on the file system and I typed 'cd home' I
+would get an error. If you need to, you can use <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>absolute
+paths</I
+></SPAN
+> to the directory you wish to get to. As an example
+if I was in some dark corner of my file-system and I need to get
+quickly to the home directory I would type:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>cd /home</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+If I needed to get to a directory under the home directory (let's say
+I have a directory in there called 'adam'), I would type:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>cd /home/adam</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>&#13;</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN894"
+>mkdir</A
+></H3
+><P
+>This is the command you used to create a directory and is short for
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Make Directory</I
+></SPAN
+>. To use this, simply type the name
+of the directory you want to create after the mkdir command as so:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>mkdir bleep</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+The above command will create a directory in the current directory I
+am in called 'bleep'. If a directory with this name already existed, I
+will get an error and the computer won't overwrite the existing
+directory. Try creating some directories.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN903"
+>pwd</A
+></H3
+><P
+>If you get lost and don't know where you are in the file-system you
+can always type <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>pwd</I
+></SPAN
+> a||nd it will tell you where
+you are. This command gives you the location path
+or <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>absolute path</I
+></SPAN
+> to where you are. For example,
+if I am in my 'adam' home directory, the output of the pwd command
+will be:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>/home/adam</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+Experiment with changing directories with *c||d* then typing *pwd* t||o
+see where you are.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN913"
+>mv</A
+></H3
+><P
+>This command is short for <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Move</I
+></SPAN
+>. It is as it
+sounds in that mv allows you to move files around on the
+file-system. This command is like the 'cut' and 'paste' actions from
+Mac and Windows rolled into one. To use mv you must first type the
+command, followed by the file you want to move (in absolute paths or
+relative paths including the filename) and then the place where you
+want to move the file to (in absolute or relative paths). For example,
+if I wanted to move a file 'me.txt' from my current directory to the
+'/usr/bin' directory I would type the following:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>mv me.txt /usr/bin</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>&#13;</P
+><P
+><SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Note</I
+></SPAN
+>: I don't have to type the filename in the
+path name where I want to move the file unless I also wish to change
+the name of the file. If for example while I was moving 'me.txt' I
+wanted to change the filename to "you.txt" I would type:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>mv me.txt /usr/bin/you.txt</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+If I just wanted to rename the file and not move it I could use mv to
+rename the file without moving it by typing this:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>mv me.txt you.txt</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>&#13;</P
+><P
+>Note that when you use mv yo||u are <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>moving</I
+></SPAN
+> the
+file not copying it, so the original will be moved and won't exist in
+the same place you moved it from. Now, also be a bit careful because
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>you can overwrite files accidentally</I
+></SPAN
+>, if for
+example I moved one file to a directory with a file of the same name,
+then the file I am moving will overwrite that file. Then you could be
+in trouble... so just be a wee bit careful.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN937"
+>rm</A
+></H3
+><P
+>On the other hand, here is a command you should be <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>very
+careful</I
+></SPAN
+> about using. rm is short
+for <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Remove</I
+></SPAN
+>, and is the command you use if you
+wish to delete a file or directory (and its contents). To use this
+command type 'rm' followed by the name of the file you wish to destroy
+for good. To remove a directory you can use the same command with the
+parameter -R like so:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>rm -R directoryname</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+Where /directoryname/ is of course the name of the directory you wish
+to remove. You can also use <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>rmdir</I
+></SPAN
+> for this which
+(you guessed it) is short for remove directory. <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Be EXTREMELY
+careful when using these commands</I
+></SPAN
+>, if used unwisely it
+could be the end of your operating system.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN949"
+>locate</A
+></H3
+><P
+>These commands help you <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>find files on your
+file-system</I
+></SPAN
+>. The location of all files on your system are
+stored in a database which is updated periodically by using the
+updatedb command. To find a file simply type 'locate' followed by
+part of the name of the file or directory you are looking for. For
+example if I am looking for the file "icecast.conf" I would type:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>locate icecast.conf</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+If I don't get any reply from typing this it means that either the
+file doesn't exist on my system or it exists but my database doesn't
+know where it is. In this later scenario I would type updatedb and try
+again.</P
+><P
+>With locate you can't destroy anything so experiment as much as you
+like. Sometimes updatedb might take a while to run if you haven't run
+the command recently or if you have a slow machine, it can also use a
+lot of CPU power on slow machines so never use it while you are doing
+something else 'mission critical' on your machine.</P
+><P
+>You might also like to experiment
+with <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>whereis</I
+></SPAN
+>, <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>which</I
+></SPAN
+> and
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>find</I
+></SPAN
+> to look for files on your system.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN963"
+>cp</A
+></H3
+><P
+>This is short for ...guesses?...<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>copy</I
+></SPAN
+>. Use it like
+'mv' , the only difference is that it leaves the original file where
+it was while also creating a copy.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN967"
+>ping</A
+></H3
+><P
+>Not usually included in the top 10 commands you need to know but its
+handy if you need to know if you are online. <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>ping</I
+></SPAN
+>
+sends a request to any computer on the net, if that computer gets the
+request it will respond. Type 'ping' followed by a URL that you know,
+for example it might be a good idea to try the following:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>ping www.google.com</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>&#13;</P
+><P
+>If that computer gets the request you will get some information coming
+back through the terminal... this will keep scrolling so to stop it
+type <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>ctrl + c</I
+></SPAN
+> and it will halt the ping process.</P
+><P
+>If you get no response from ping then you are probably
+offline. However, some machines online don't answer ping requests for
+security and other reasons... so make sure you really know that the
+machine you are pinging does reply to ping requests.</P
+><P
+>Also, some internet connections won't allow ping traffic... for
+example, while I am writing this I am in an internet cafe in
+Riga,...its a fast connection but I can't ping, this is perhaps
+because they think only evil hackers use ping so they have some
+paranoid network security disallowing all sorts of useful things....</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN980"
+>tab</A
+></H3
+><P
+>Tab is not so much a command as a keystroke... every keyboard has
+a <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>tab key</I
+></SPAN
+>, and its a very useful thing to have in
+GNU/Linux. You might have used this keystroke before to indent words
+in a word processor. You can still do this in GNU/Linux word
+processors, but when you use tab in the Linux terminal it becomes such
+a time saver that when you master it you will be using it all the
+time.</P
+><P
+>Essentially the tab keystroke is like
+an <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>auto-complete</I
+></SPAN
+>. If, for example, I want to move
+the file 'dsjkdshdsdsjhds_ddsjw22.txt' somewhere with the 'mv' command
+I can either type out every letter of the stupid filename, or I can
+type 'mv' (for 'move') followed by the first few letters of the
+filename and press 'tab'. The rest of the filename will be
+automagically filled in. If the filename is not filled in it means
+that there are several files (or directories) that start with those
+first few letters I typed. To remedy this I could type a few more
+letters of the filename and press tab again, or to help me out I could
+press *tab* twice and it will give me a list of files that start with
+those letters.</P
+><P
+>Tab is your friend, use it a lot.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN987"
+>Other Commands</A
+></H3
+><P
+>At the beginning of this section I said there where a few 'other'
+commands that might also be good to know, they were:
+
+<P
+></P
+><TABLE
+BORDER="0"
+><TBODY
+><TR
+><TD
+>ldconfig</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>./configure</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>make</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>make install</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>tar</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>more</TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+>whereis</TD
+></TR
+></TBODY
+></TABLE
+><P
+></P
+>
+
+I have already talked about some of them, namely *whereis* and
+*updatedb*. The others might be useful if you are installing software.</P
+><P
+>More is use if you want to control the overly verbose output of any
+command to the terminal. If for example, I am in a directory which
+contains 1000 files and I type 'ls' the output of the command won't
+fit nicely into my little terminal window so it will go scrolling past
+faster than is useful. To slow it down so I can read the output we
+follow the command with more like so:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>ls | more</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+If I used this in my 1000 file directory I get one page at a time of
+output and pressing the space-bar shows the next page. Pressing 'q'
+quits more. Ok, so you might be wondering what the funny straight line
+is in the above command... well, this is known as
+the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>pipe</I
+></SPAN
+> command.</P
+><P
+>Pipe allows you to combine commands together to control the kind of
+output you get, usually its used to refine a command (which is what
+the command parameters also do). So, when you get really fluent with
+these commands you can write things that look more like equations but
+are really efficient ways of using standard commands... pipe will be
+central to enhancing your efficiency.</P
+></DIV
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN1006"
+>Linux File Structure</A
+></H2
+><P
+>If you open your terminal and type the following (followed by pressing
+the 'return' button):
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>cd /</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+You will be placed in the top directory of the Linux file system. If you
+then type:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>ls -al</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+You will see something similar to this:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+>total 80
+drwxr-xr-x 19 root root 4096 Oct 9 13:57 .
+drwxr-xr-x 19 root root 4096 Oct 9 13:57 ..
+drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Oct 5 09:31 bin
+drwxr-xr-x 3 root root 4096 Oct 9 21:47 boot
+drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 0 Jan 1 1970 dev
+drwxr-xr-x 71 root root 4096 Oct 15 11:35 etc
+drwxr-xr-x 4 root root 4096 Oct 9 19:21 home
+drwxr-xr-x 8 root root 4096 Sep 18 23:29 lib
+drwx------ 2 root root 16384 Sep 18 20:06 lost+found
+drwxr-xr-x 9 root root 4096 Oct 9 16:36 mnt
+drwxr-xr-x 9 root root 4096 Oct 8 23:20 opt
+dr-xr-xr-x 64 root root 0 Oct 15 11:35 proc
+drwx------ 75 root root 8192 Oct 15 12:35 root
+drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Sep 23 18:58 sbin
+drwxr-xr-x 9 root root 0 Oct 15 11:35 sys
+drwxrwxrwt 60 root root 4096 Oct 15 12:36 tmp
+drwxr-xr-x 17 root root 4096 Oct 5 09:31 usr
+drwxr-xr-x 15 root root 4096 Oct 9 13:57 var</PRE
+>&#13;</P
+><P
+>The above listing is a fairly standard directory structure for Linux.
+Each name on the far right represents a directory, and each directory
+contains files and directories that are specific to that
+directory. the 'lib' directory, for example contains code libraries
+that the software on your system uses. For now you only need to be
+concerned with one directory: the 'home' directory. This directory
+contains folders that have names corresponding to each user of the
+machine. If you log in as 'adam' for example then you will be logged
+into a directory in the 'home' directory with the same name as your
+username (i.e., 'adam' in this example).</P
+><P
+>The important thing to be aware of right now is this Linux directory
+structure. The other important thing is that Linux is mostly comprised
+of text files, so you can change almost every part of Linux - how it
+looks and works - by just editing the appropriate text file. In
+Windows and Macintosh environments you would usually do these kind of
+changes through small applications with a graphic user interface
+(GUI). In Windows, for example, if you want to change the resolution
+of your display you use the 'display' control panel located in the
+'control panels' directory. In Linux you can do this by editing a text
+file.</P
+><P
+>This has some advantages - one is that it gives you a lot more
+control. But it also has some disadvantages - it can be difficult to
+learn which files to edit and what to change. Sometimes, to ease the
+transition to Linux from other operating systems, you will find there
+are configuration softwares for Linux installed on your system that
+use a GUI (Graphical User Interface) similar to Macintosh and
+Windows. This is not always the case however, and so eventually you
+will find yourself doing this manually with a text editor.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN1023"
+>Text Editors</A
+></H2
+><P
+>If you don't know how to use a text editor in Linux then you can't
+really get too far. Reading 'README' files and 'INSTALL' files will be
+a necessity quite early on when learning Linux on the command line.</P
+><P
+>Text editors is a topic that many books have been written about. So,
+how do we cover it here and do it justice... well its tricky. We can
+at best get a superficial glimpse. We will arbitrarily choose a
+couple: <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>nano</I
+></SPAN
+> and <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>vim</I
+></SPAN
+>. We
+will also look at <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>less</I
+></SPAN
+> which is not an editor but
+is a command that allows you to read files on your system.
+&#13;</P
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN1030"
+>less</A
+></H3
+><P
+>Lets start with 'less'. This is a command that opens text files for
+reading only. If, for example, the directory you are currently working
+in has a file called 'README', then try this command:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>less README</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+and you should see something like this in the terminal:
+
+
+less.jpg&#13;</P
+><P
+>To scroll use the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>up and down arrows</I
+></SPAN
+>, and to quit
+just type <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>q</I
+></SPAN
+></P
+><P
+>Remember that less will only allow you to read files. To edit files
+you will need a text editor or word processor (Sometimes there isn't
+much difference between the two).</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN1042"
+>vim</A
+></H3
+><P
+>Vim is a text editor commonly used by programmers for working on code.
+When you type *vim* in the terminal you will see something like this:
+
+vim.jpg
+
+If you have *vi* installed you will see pretty much the same thing.</P
+><P
+>To open a file with *vim* it is best if you type the name of the file
+you wish to open after the vim command, so that vim opens with the
+file already loaded. For example if we wanted to read a "README" file
+in the same directory we are currently working in then just type:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>vim README</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+This will open vim with the README file loaded as so:
+
+vim_muse.jpg &#13;</P
+><P
+>Now to scroll up and down the file use the up and down arrows on your
+keyboard. To quit vim press <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>:</I
+></SPAN
+>
+then <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>q</I
+></SPAN
+> then enter.</P
+><P
+>There is really a lot to 'vi' or 'vim', and I don't want to get into
+it here, but you should really know how to open a file (as above) and
+then edit a file. To edit a file in vim you need to first open the
+file, and then press <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>i</I
+></SPAN
+>.</P
+><P
+>Now, I am imagining vim is quite a bit different to any text editor
+you have used before, so perhaps some explanation is needed. Vim opens
+a file initially as a read only file. This means that when you first
+open the file with vim you are not allowed to change the file. Vim has
+then a whole world of commands you can use to work on the file and
+most of the commands are executed by just typing a single letter, or
+they are in the format:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+>: command</PRE
+>
+
+Where 'command' is the name of the command you wish to use. The
+commands are all designated by shortcuts. An 'i' , for example, is
+short for 'insert'. The following is a table of vim commands you
+should know:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+>command action
+i (only used in read-only mode) insert text
+:w (only used in read-only mode) write changes to file
+u (only used in read-only mode) undo changes
+:q (only used in read-only mode) quit vim</PRE
+>&#13;</P
+><P
+>In addition, by pressing the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>esc</I
+></SPAN
+> (escape) key,
+you will tell vim to return to the original mode (read only). You must
+actually press escape before you execute any of the commands in
+vim. For example if I wanted to open the file "README" and then alter
+some text, I would do the following, starting with
+typing <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>vim README</I
+></SPAN
+> in the terminal. This will open
+the "README" file as explained above. Then if I wish to edit the
+file, I use my arrow keys to navigate to where I want to insert or
+delete some text. I then press <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>i</I
+></SPAN
+>, this will put
+me in the insertion mode and now anything I type will appear in the
+document itself. When I have finished making the changes I will then
+press the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>esc</I
+></SPAN
+> key, and finally to save the
+changes I press <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>:w</I
+></SPAN
+>. This will write the file with
+the new changes. I then need to quit from vim so I press
+the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>escape key followed by :q</I
+></SPAN
+>.</P
+><P
+>Now find a file and experiment. If you haven't used something like vim
+before then it might take some getting used to, so spend some time
+working out for yourself how vim works before you really need to use
+it.</P
+></DIV
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN1067"
+>Install Software from Source</A
+></H2
+><P
+>Well, installing software on Linux is a broad subject because each
+version of Linux has its own package management system. However all
+types of Linux allow the user to install software using the source
+code. However you probably don't want to tackle this process unless
+you know a little bit about how to use Linux commands and a little
+about the Linux file system. If you don't know about these two then
+its better to read up on them first and then return here.</P
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN1070"
+>Uncompress</A
+></H3
+><P
+>Installing from source works on any Linux system, so its a good
+process to know, and it more or less follows this route once you have
+a source package:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>tar xvfz packagename.tar.gz</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+Where 'packagename' in the example above is the actual name of your
+package that you wish to install. The <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>tar</I
+></SPAN
+> command
+followed by the parameters <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>xvfz</I
+></SPAN
+> uncompresses a
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>tar.gz</I
+></SPAN
+> file and creates a new directory with all
+the extracted sources. Now you must change your working directory to
+this new directory using the 'cd' command. Usually the new directory
+name is the name of the compressed source package minus the '.tar.gz'
+suffix. For example, if my package really was called
+'packagename.tar.gz' then after running the 'tar zxvf' command on it I
+would be left with a new directory called 'packagename' and then I
+would type 'cd packagename' to enter this new directory. If you are
+not sure of the name of the newly created package type 'ls'.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN1081"
+>Configure</A
+></H3
+><P
+>Alright... once inside the new directory, we want to start the actual
+installation process. To do this 99% of the time you will need to type
+the following:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>./configure</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+Ok, so this isn't really a command. Each installation package usually
+has a script called <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>configure</I
+></SPAN
+>. By putting a dot
+and then a slash before the name of the script ( ./configure ) you are
+telling Linux to execute (run) that script. The configure script then
+does its stuff, checking what kind of machine you have, what you
+already have installed, what kind of Linux you are running etc etc
+etc.</P
+><P
+>The most common problem that will occur at this stage is that the
+configure script will halt and tell you that software library that the
+new software depends on is missing. This can be a pain which is why
+people invented package management systems. However if you do
+experience this error then you need to use a search engine to find out
+what software the error message is talking about and where to get it,
+then start the installation process again with this new package. I am
+not kidding when I say that this can sometimes mean an installation
+can take days while you search and download all the packages you need.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H3
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN1091"
+>Compile</A
+></H3
+><P
+>So, lets assume you don't get any errors created by running the
+configure script... in which case you are lucky and you should thank
+whatever angel is looking over you...Now... the next command to type
+in the install process is make like so:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>make</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+This command actually makes (compiles) the software for you. You will
+then end up with a whole lot of compiled files which in total makes up
+your software. The 'make' process can take a while depending on the
+speed of your machine and the size of the package sources you are
+installing. Running other applications will also slow down the
+process.</P
+><P
+>When *make* has stopped, type the following:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>make install</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+this will install the newly created software in the correct places in
+your system. So now you just need to type the name of the application
+in your terminal window and it should run. If it doesn't run and
+throws an error, a common remedy is to type *ldconfig* and then try
+again. <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>ldconfig</I
+></SPAN
+> updates the system so that your
+operating system knows there are new library files etc.</P
+></DIV
+></DIV
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="CHAPTER"
+><HR><H1
+><A
+NAME="AEN1106"
+></A
+>Chapter 10. Development tools</H1
+><H2
+>Extend and customize the dyne liveCD</H2
+><FONT
+COLOR="RED"
+>Extend and customize the dyne liveCD</FONT
+><P
+>&#13;Dyne:II comes with an SDK to re-master a dyne liveCD including all
+your modifications and to package additional software collections.
+In fact, Dyne:II is a Dyne to produce Dyne.
+
+See it like a Nomad Distribution attached to no hardware. You carry
+your live cd/dvd/usb key loaded. you boot on it on any machine, you do
+your stuff (from a user AND/OR developer point of view), you create a
+new live cd, you remove all your traces and you leave the camp. Just
+walk around the world with your rewritable CD or usb-stick and that's
+it.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;Dyne:bolic is a quite simple and minimalistic operating system (the
+underlying distribution philosophy can be referred to the Slackware
+one and more in general to the KISS principle), all scripted in shell,
+awk and sed from scratch. Function libraries along with auxiliary
+programs are all included in the /lib/dyne directory, where the code
+is fairly documented.&#13;</P
+><P
+>&#13;In this chapter you'll find documentation on how to create and publish
+new modules, repack a new CD. For more informations and as a reference
+to the inner structure of dyne:bolic keep in mind this distribution is
+written from scratch following the
+book <A
+HREF="http://www.linuxfromscratch.org"
+TARGET="_top"
+>Linux From
+Scratch</A
+> which provides an extensive explanation on how
+everything was put together</P
+><P
+>The GNU C and C++ Compiler is included along with several scripting
+language and relative toolkit externals as Python, Perl, Tcl/Tk and
+Ruby. Also 3 different integrated development environments are
+included for visual programming: <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Glade</I
+></SPAN
+> working
+with GTK and C, <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Fluid</I
+></SPAN
+> working with Fltk and C++,
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>Gambas</I
+></SPAN
+> (provided by the external devel module)
+for basic visual programming. Also
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>gtkdialog</I
+></SPAN
+> is used so you can quickly realize
+graphical dialogs and user interaction combining various components.</P
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN1124"
+>Customize your dyne liveCD</A
+></H2
+><P
+>It is possible to customize and expand dyne:bolic in various ways:
+creating software modules to add applications and distribute them to
+friends, as well change the behaviour of the system when booting. To
+facilitate customization and development
+a <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>dynesdk</I
+></SPAN
+> tool is provided, automatizing the
+process of packing changes into a new live CD.</P
+><P
+>For a good introduction on the potential of this tool you can read
+online Stomfi's article on customizing dyne:bolic
+on <A
+HREF="http://www.linux.com/articles/54607"
+TARGET="_top"
+>http://www.linux.com/articles/54607</A
+></P
+><P
+>To get started with your development first create the SDK in the DOCK
+on your harddisk:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>dynesdk mksdk</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+you'll be prompted with two questions: it is safe to
+answer <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>no</I
+></SPAN
+> in both cases, unless you want to
+change things in the dyne:II core:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>* [?] do you want to uncompress the dyne.sys (y/N) ?</SAMP
+>
+<SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>* [?] do you want to download the kernel sources (y/N) ?</SAMP
+></PRE
+>
+
+in case you don't give an answer, it will default to NO after 10
+seconds and go on.</P
+><P
+>This procedure will create an SDK directory inside $DYNE_SYS_MNT/dyne,
+then populate it with development files that are downloaded from the
+online subversion repository if you have network connectivity.</P
+><P
+>With the SDK you can pack modifications to your system inside a new CD
+ISO: that is created out of the contents of SDK/cdrom, you can add and
+remove modules from SDK/cdrom/dyne/modules as well add things inside
+the CD filesystem.</P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN1144"
+>Create new software modules</A
+></H2
+><P
+>Once you have an SDK and some space available on your harddisk
+you can start creating your own software modules to add applications
+to dyne:bolic, see the "Extra software modules" section of this manual
+for more information about features and usage of .dyne modules, now
+we'll go on with some instructions on how to create them.</P
+><P
+>First of all make sure you dock your system on a harddisk, then create
+an SDK (see previous chapter). When you have an SDK directory in your
+harddisk you can see it's location just typing:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>echo $DYNE_SYS_MNT/SDK</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+Next step is to create the module directory in the SDK, so let's
+choose our module name first: we are going to create the spaghetti
+module, with the commands
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>mkdir -p $DYNE_SYS_MNT/SDK/modules/spaghetti</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+>
+<SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>mkdir $DYNE_SYS_MNT/SDK/modules/spaghetti/bin</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+>
+<SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>mkdir $DYNE_SYS_MNT/SDK/modules/spaghetti/lib</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+>
+<SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>touch $DYNE_SYS_MNT/SDK/modules/spaghetti/VERSION</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+basically we are just creating the bin and lib directories and a
+VERSION file inside the module, you can do that with any filebrowser
+or midnight commander if you like: c'mon, make yourself comfortable ;)</P
+><P
+>The last thing to do is to activate our spaghetti module, mounting it
+on /opt/spaghetti since all modules are activated in the /opt
+prefix. To do that we use again a DyneSdk command
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>dynesdk mount</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+>
+<SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>source /boot/dynenv.modules</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+That's it! our new module is mounted in /opt and we have our PATHs
+configured accordingly.</P
+><P
+>Keep in mind that you need to use dynesdk mount once after every boot,
+before starting development on your module. You can as well open up
+for development an already existing module (your good old gnocchi
+module for instance) with the command:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>dynesdk devel gnocchi</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+You'll be then prompted with a question, if you want to decompress the
+content of the module for development, with an indication about the
+space that will be occupied by it on your harddisk.</P
+><P
+>Now you can compile the spaghetti software you like with
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>./configure --prefix=/opt/spaghetti</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+or editing the PREFIX in the Makefile in some cases - and don't forget
+the sauce! :)</P
+><P
+>To make it easier, when software is built with the usual "./configure
+&#38;&#38; make &#38;&#38; make install", you can use
+the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>dynemodconf</I
+></SPAN
+> command (followed by the module
+name) instead of calling ./configure directly: that will set the
+prefix and more environment correctly, for example to compile
+"aglio-0.5" with flag "--with-basilico" inside our spaghetti module:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~/aglio-0.5 # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>dynemodconf spaghetti --with-basilico</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+Once you are done with cook... ahem, compiling, then you can squash
+everything into a compressed .dyne module with
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~/aglio-0.5 # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>dynesdk squash spaghetti</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+and that's it! your new module will be found in
+$DYNE_SYS_MNT/dyne/SDK/cdrom/dyne/modules/spaghetti.dyne and ready
+to be included in the next CD ISO that you can pack with dynesdk
+mkiso.</P
+><P
+></P
+><P
+>Before releasing your module into the public, is a good idea to fill
+up some information about your creation so that people can contact you
+and visit software homepages. That's what the VERSION file is for, and
+it's format is very simple:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+>name Spaghetti
+desc spaghetti pizza mandolino e presidente scemo
+version 1.0
+url http://tuttifrutti.org/spaghetti
+packager The Crazy Cook http://tuttifrutti.org/~crazycook</PRE
+>
+
+Just use your favorite text editor to fill in these fields, leave a
+space or a tab between the field name and value and that's it.</P
+><P
+>&#13;</P
+><P
+>You can add entries and submenus for the user to start up your
+software. To do so create an applist file inside your module's etc
+directory, like for example /opt/spaghetti/etc/applist.
+
+The applist file will list application binaries, descriptions and ways
+to start them up thru flags. Here it follows a description of the
+format, basically a | separated list:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+># format:
+# name | description | command | flags | web url | author
+
+# flags:
+# runonce | multi = if there should be only one instance running, or not
+# terminal = if it should run in a terminal
+# manual = if it's a manual entry
+# root | user = if it must be run as root or as user
+
+# submenus can start and end with
+# Begin | MySubmenu
+# End | MySubmenu</PRE
+>
+
+for example:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+>Begin | SPAGHETTI
+
+AglioeOlio | aglio olio e peperoncino | pasta --agliolio | | http://tuttifrutti.org | The Crazy Cook
+Puttanesca | olive capperi e alici | pasta --puttan | | http://tuttifrutti.org | The Crazy Cook
+Pesto | pesto alla genovese | pasta --pesto | | http://tuttifrutti.org | The Crazy Cook
+
+End | SPAGHETTI</PRE
+>
+
+You can also have submenus, just use Begin and End once again
+inside. For a complete example see the system application list in
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>$DYNE_SYS_MNT/applist</I
+></SPAN
+>.</P
+><P
+>In case your module needs to set environment variables (like custom
+paths and general settings for applications) you can simply declare
+them in a env file inside the etc directory. That file can contain
+declarations of environment variables, one per line, which will be
+exported in the running system, for example in our spaghetti module
+<SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>/opt/spaghetti/etc/env</I
+></SPAN
+> will look like:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+>KITCHEN_PATH=/opt/spaghetti/lib/kitchen
+GLOBAL_TASTE=spicy
+COOK_PROFILE=big_nose</PRE
+></P
+><P
+>You can include your own home settings inside a module, so that they
+will override the default dyne:II user settings. This is useful when
+you want to change the window manager default configuration (with a
+new desktop image for example) or deliver pre-configured applications
+(with a .config file in home).
+
+To do this you simply have to create a <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>skel</I
+></SPAN
+>
+directory inside your module: all files that are included in it will
+be automatically copied into all users home directories and setted up
+to be adopted for users that are created in future. &#60;</P
+><P
+></P
+><P
+>In your modules you can include any kernel module correctly compiled
+for the dyne:II kernel.
+
+To do this you have to create a <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>kernel</I
+></SPAN
+> directory
+inside your module: all kernel modules contained will be searched and
+loaded if found by the <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>loadmod</I
+></SPAN
+> command, to be
+used instead of the standard modprobe.
+
+In case the module is not naturally requested by your hardware
+configuration (not listed by the pcimodules command), you build your
+own detection or force loading of your module inside a module startup
+script.
+
+You can prepare a script inside your module to be executed every time
+your module is activated.
+
+To do this you have to create an <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>etc</I
+></SPAN
+> directory
+inside your module: <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>all executable files included in the
+rc.* wildcard</I
+></SPAN
+> will be launched at startup, with the first
+$1 argument being the name of the module itself.</P
+><P
+>So here is resumed the file structure contained in modules:
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+>VERSION required file contains information about the module and its sources
+bin optional directory contains all binaries, automatically included in $PATH
+lib optional directory contains all libraries, automatically included in $LD_LIBRARY_PATH
+etc optional directory, contains rc.* startup scripts executed at activation
+skel optional directory, contains all settings to be added to /home/user and /etc/skel
+kernel optional directory, contains kernel modules that can be loaded by loadmod</PRE
+>
+You have the power to create, now go make something wonderful! :)</P
+><P
+></P
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><HR><H2
+CLASS="SECTION"
+><A
+NAME="AEN1226"
+>Compile a new kernel</A
+></H2
+><P
+>Assumed that you already learned how to compile a Linux kernel from
+the sources available on <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>kernel.org</I
+></SPAN
+>, compiling a
+new kernel for dyne:bolic is relatively easy.</P
+><P
+>Just go ahead as usual after unpacking the sourcecode:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>make menuconfig</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+The kernel configuration will be prompted, which you can adapt as
+desired. In case you like to start from the current running dyne:bolic
+kernel as a base configuration, do from inside the kernel directory:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>zcat /proc/config.gz &#62; .config</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+>
+<SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>make oldconfig</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+In case you are compiling a more recent kernel, you'll be prompted to
+answer to new questions introduced by this version. After configuring
+your kernel you can compile it using <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>make</I
+></SPAN
+>:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>make bzImage &#38;&#38; make modules</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>&#13;</P
+><P
+>After you are done with your kernel compilation, packing a dyne:bolic
+kernel is done with a simple command given inside the linux source
+directory:
+
+<PRE
+CLASS="SCREEN"
+><SAMP
+CLASS="PROMPT"
+>[d:b] ~ # </SAMP
+><KBD
+CLASS="USERINPUT"
+>dynesdk mkkern</KBD
+> <B
+CLASS="KEYCAP"
+>[Enter]</B
+></PRE
+>
+
+The <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>mkkern</I
+></SPAN
+> function of dynesdk will pack the
+kernel and its modules inside <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>SDK/cdrom/dyne</I
+></SPAN
+>. A
+compressed file containing all modules (usually sized below 20MB) will
+be named after the linux version with file
+extension <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>.kmods</I
+></SPAN
+>. The kernel itself will also be
+named after the linux version (reduced to 8.3 chars for compatibility
+with some bootloaders) with file extension <SPAN
+CLASS="emphasis"
+><I
+CLASS="EMPHASIS"
+>.krn</I
+></SPAN
+>.</P
+><P
+>The reason of this setup is that, having all the kernel and its
+modules in two files easily recognizable by their extension it becomes
+very easy to swap kernels in a dock: just drop the new files inside
+the dyne/ directory and re-configure the bootloader accordingly. Since
+the .krn and .kmods files are already compressed, distribution of new
+dyne:bolic kernels can be done as-is, just sharing the two files
+around.</P
+></DIV
+></DIV
+><DIV
+CLASS="INDEX"
+><HR><H1
+><A
+NAME="AEN1262"
+></A
+>Index</H1
+><DL
+><DT
+> Audio ,
+ <A
+HREF="c534.htm"
+>Audio production</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+> Amarok ,
+ <A
+HREF="c534.htm#AEN544"
+>Play</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Ardour ,
+ <A
+HREF="x594.htm"
+>Record and edit</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Audacity ,
+ <A
+HREF="x594.htm"
+>Record and edit</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Formats ,
+ <A
+HREF="c534.htm#AEN544"
+>Play</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Free Wheeling ,
+ <A
+HREF="x570.htm"
+>Perform</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Hydrogen ,
+ <A
+HREF="x570.htm"
+>Perform</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Jack Rack ,
+ <A
+HREF="x570.htm"
+>Perform</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Jamin ,
+ <A
+HREF="x570.htm"
+>Perform</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> MikMod ,
+ <A
+HREF="c534.htm#AEN544"
+>Play</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> MuSE ,
+ <A
+HREF="x618.htm"
+>Stream</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Rezound ,
+ <A
+HREF="x594.htm"
+>Record and edit</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Streaming manual ,
+ <A
+HREF="x618.htm"
+>Stream</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Time Machine ,
+ <A
+HREF="x594.htm"
+>Record and edit</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Timidity ,
+ <A
+HREF="c534.htm#AEN544"
+>Play</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Xmms ,
+ <A
+HREF="c534.htm#AEN544"
+>Play</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Image
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+> Blender ,
+ <A
+HREF="c632.htm"
+>Graphical software</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Gimp ,
+ <A
+HREF="c632.htm"
+>Graphical software</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> GQview ,
+ <A
+HREF="c632.htm"
+>Graphical software</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> ImageMagick ,
+ <A
+HREF="c632.htm"
+>Graphical software</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> InkScape ,
+ <A
+HREF="c632.htm"
+>Graphical software</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Network ,
+ <A
+HREF="c704.htm"
+>Communication software</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+> Email ,
+ <A
+HREF="x752.htm"
+>Email and encryption</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Links ,
+ <A
+HREF="c704.htm#AEN717"
+>Surf the web</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Mozilla ,
+ <A
+HREF="c704.htm#AEN717"
+>Surf the web</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> NVU Web page editor ,
+ <A
+HREF="c704.htm#AEN717"
+>Surf the web</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Samba ,
+ <A
+HREF="c704.htm"
+>Communication software</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Thunderbird ,
+ <A
+HREF="x752.htm"
+>Email and encryption</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Tor ,
+ <A
+HREF="c704.htm#AEN717"
+>Surf the web</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Wget Web spider ,
+ <A
+HREF="c704.htm#AEN717"
+>Surf the web</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Privacy
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+> Email ,
+ <A
+HREF="x752.htm"
+>Email and encryption</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Enigmail ,
+ <A
+HREF="x752.htm"
+>Email and encryption</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Gpa ,
+ <A
+HREF="x752.htm"
+>Email and encryption</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Tor anonymity proxy ,
+ <A
+HREF="c704.htm#AEN717"
+>Surf the web</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Text ,
+ <A
+HREF="c664.htm"
+>Text software</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+> AbiWord ,
+ <A
+HREF="c664.htm"
+>Text software</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> AntiWord ,
+ <A
+HREF="c664.htm"
+>Text software</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Nedit ,
+ <A
+HREF="c664.htm"
+>Text software</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Open Office ,
+ <A
+HREF="c664.htm"
+>Text software</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Scribus ,
+ <A
+HREF="c664.htm"
+>Text software</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Video ,
+ <A
+HREF="c403.htm"
+>Video production</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+> AviDeMux ,
+ <A
+HREF="x487.htm"
+>Edit</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Cinelerra ,
+ <A
+HREF="x487.htm"
+>Edit</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+>Device setup,
+ <A
+HREF="c403.htm#AEN411"
+>Configure your video devices</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> EffecTV ,
+ <A
+HREF="x426.htm"
+>VeeJay</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> FFMpeg ,
+ <A
+HREF="x457.htm"
+>Play</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> FreeJ ,
+ <A
+HREF="x426.htm"
+>VeeJay</A
+>,
+ <A
+HREF="x509.htm"
+>Stream</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> HasciiCam ,
+ <A
+HREF="x509.htm"
+>Stream</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Kino ,
+ <A
+HREF="x472.htm"
+>Record</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Mencoder ,
+ <A
+HREF="x472.htm"
+>Record</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Mpeg4IP ,
+ <A
+HREF="x509.htm"
+>Stream</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Mplayer ,
+ <A
+HREF="x457.htm"
+>Play</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Pure Data ,
+ <A
+HREF="x426.htm"
+>VeeJay</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Transcode ,
+ <A
+HREF="x487.htm"
+>Edit</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Xaos ,
+ <A
+HREF="x426.htm"
+>VeeJay</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> XawTV ,
+ <A
+HREF="x472.htm"
+>Record</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+> Xine ,
+ <A
+HREF="x457.htm"
+>Play</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+>afrolinux,
+ <A
+HREF="x63.htm"
+>This is Rasta software</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>Architecture,
+ <A
+HREF="c1106.htm"
+>Development tools</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>boot from harddisk,
+ <A
+HREF="c222.htm#AEN226"
+>Boot from harddisk</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>boot from network,
+ <A
+HREF="x262.htm"
+>Boot from network</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>cd,
+ <A
+HREF="c780.htm#AEN788"
+>Text commands</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>cfdisk,
+ <A
+HREF="c222.htm#AEN226"
+>Boot from harddisk</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>CLI,
+ <A
+HREF="c780.htm"
+>Command line console</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>Customize,
+ <A
+HREF="c1106.htm"
+>Development tools</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>docking,
+ <A
+HREF="x185.htm"
+>Install on harddisk? Dock!</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>filesystem organization,
+ <A
+HREF="x138.htm"
+>Access your data volumes</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>grub,
+ <A
+HREF="c222.htm#AEN226"
+>Boot from harddisk</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>GUI,
+ <A
+HREF="c780.htm"
+>Command line console</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>license
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+><DT
+>copyright,
+ <A
+HREF="x106.htm"
+>License and disclaimer</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DD
+><DL
+></DL
+></DD
+></DL
+></DD
+><DT
+>lilo,
+ <A
+HREF="c222.htm#AEN226"
+>Boot from harddisk</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>ls,
+ <A
+HREF="c780.htm#AEN788"
+>Text commands</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>man,
+ <A
+HREF="c780.htm#AEN788"
+>Text commands</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>manuals,
+ <A
+HREF="c26.htm#AEN45"
+>How to use this manual</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>mke3fs,
+ <A
+HREF="c222.htm#AEN226"
+>Boot from harddisk</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>modules,
+ <A
+HREF="x201.htm"
+>Extra software modules</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>nesting,
+ <A
+HREF="x161.htm"
+>Nest your home and settings</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>NTFS,
+ <A
+HREF="c116.htm"
+>Discover the system</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>partitioning,
+ <A
+HREF="c222.htm#AEN226"
+>Boot from harddisk</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>Programming,
+ <A
+HREF="c1106.htm"
+>Development tools</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>pure:dyne,
+ <A
+HREF="x201.htm"
+>Extra software modules</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>rastasoft,
+ <A
+HREF="x63.htm"
+>This is Rasta software</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>SDK,
+ <A
+HREF="c1106.htm#AEN1124"
+>Customize your dyne liveCD</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>streamtime,
+ <A
+HREF="x82.htm"
+>Streamtime</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>usb pendrive,
+ <A
+HREF="x138.htm"
+>Access your data volumes</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>Volumes,
+ <A
+HREF="c116.htm"
+>Discover the system</A
+>
+ </DT
+><DT
+>Xfce,
+ <A
+HREF="c116.htm#AEN118"
+>Your desktop environment</A
+>
+ </DT
+></DL
+></DIV
+></DIV
+><H3
+CLASS="FOOTNOTES"
+>Notes</H3
+><TABLE
+BORDER="0"
+CLASS="FOOTNOTES"
+WIDTH="100%"
+><TR
+><TD
+ALIGN="LEFT"
+VALIGN="TOP"
+WIDTH="5%"
+><A
+NAME="FTN.AEN98"
+HREF="#AEN98"
+><SPAN
+CLASS="footnote"
+>[1]</SPAN
+></A
+></TD
+><TD
+ALIGN="LEFT"
+VALIGN="TOP"
+WIDTH="95%"
+><P
+>quote from Privacy Conference, Social Research, New
+School University</P
+></TD
+></TR
+><TR
+><TD
+ALIGN="LEFT"
+VALIGN="TOP"
+WIDTH="5%"
+><A
+NAME="FTN.AEN670"
+HREF="#AEN670"
+><SPAN
+CLASS="footnote"
+>[2]</SPAN
+></A
+></TD
+><TD
+ALIGN="LEFT"
+VALIGN="TOP"
+WIDTH="95%"
+><P
+>You shouldn't use the .DOC format for many reasons: it exposes
+all your previous changes in your documents which can often lead to
+a privacy problem, it can vehicle dangerous viruses that affect other
+proprietary systems and it stores your text in a non-readable way
+which ties you up to the availability of proprietary software.
+See the extensive document <A
+HREF="http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/no-word-attachments.html"
+TARGET="_top"
+>http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/no-word-attachments.html</A
+>
+on the topic. However, dyne:bolic is able to read and write all .DOC files.</P
+></TD
+></TR
+></TABLE
+></BODY
+></HTML
+> \ No newline at end of file
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+<chapter>
+<title>Graphical software</title>
+<subtitle>Image manipulation and 3d modeling</subtitle>
+
+<para>
+The dyne:bolic distribution includes some eccellent programs
+for image composition and 3d modeling:
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Image </primary>
+<secondary> Gimp </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>Gimp</emphasis> is a well mature application capable to
+create and edit bitmap images, offers a perfect environment for
+web graphics as well a powerful script engine to automatize its
+operations and even generate automatically stylish logos.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Image </primary>
+<secondary> InkScape </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>Inkscape</emphasis> is a vectorial graphics editor suitable
+for free hand drawing, cartoons and comics and more generally scalable
+graphics, realizing an ideal tool for flyers, high resolution prints
+and quadri-chromic prints
+
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Image </primary>
+<secondary> Blender </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>Blender</emphasis> consists of a powerful environment for
+3d modeling and game development: it features a well designed
+interface, a ray tracing engine and scriptability of object behaviours
+in python: it can produce rendered scenes as well interactive applications
+and animations on timelines.
+There is allready a great comunity of artists using it, tutorial and
+examples are available on its website, as well a detailed manual that
+can be ordered online. Blender is one of the best tools in the open source
+and free software world for multimedia productions of many kinds, being
+adopted in the production of several professional movies.
+Using the clustering capability of dyne:bolic you can easily build render
+farms distributing the load on several computers on the same network, see
+the Spot's tutorial available online on <ulink url="http://"></ulink>.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Image </primary>
+<secondary> GQview </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>GQview</emphasis> is an easy to use image browser which you can
+also use to build slideshows to interactively show your image galleries.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Image </primary>
+<secondary> ImageMagick </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>ImageMagick</emphasis> is a set of commandline tools, starting
+from the <emphasis>convert</emphasis> terminal command
+(see <emphasis>man convert</emphasis>) you can easily script batch operations
+over multiple files, applying format conversion and filters on large
+quantities of images.
+</para>
+
+</chapter>
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@@ -0,0 +1,398 @@
+<index>
+
+<!-- This file was produced by collateindex.pl. -->
+<!-- Remove this comment if you edit this file by hand! -->
+<!-- ULINK is abused here.
+
+ The URL attribute holds the URL that points from the index entry
+ back to the appropriate place in the output produced by the HTML
+ stylesheet. (It's much easier to calculate this URL in the first
+ pass.)
+
+ The Role attribute holds the ID (either real or manufactured) of
+ the corresponding INDEXTERM. This is used by the print backends
+ to produce page numbers.
+
+ The entries below are sorted and collated into the correct order.
+ Duplicates may be removed in the HTML backend, but in the print
+ backends, it is impossible to suppress duplicate pages or coalesce
+ sequences of pages into a range.
+-->
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie> Audio ,
+ <ulink url="c534.htm" role="AEN537">Audio production</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Amarok ,
+ <ulink url="c534.htm#AEN544" role="AEN556">Play</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Ardour ,
+ <ulink url="x594.htm" role="AEN598">Record and edit</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Audacity ,
+ <ulink url="x594.htm" role="AEN604">Record and edit</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Formats ,
+ <ulink url="c534.htm#AEN544" role="AEN547">Play</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Free Wheeling ,
+ <ulink url="x570.htm" role="AEN590">Perform</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Hydrogen ,
+ <ulink url="x570.htm" role="AEN574">Perform</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Jack Rack ,
+ <ulink url="x570.htm" role="AEN585">Perform</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Jamin ,
+ <ulink url="x570.htm" role="AEN580">Perform</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> MikMod ,
+ <ulink url="c534.htm#AEN544" role="AEN566">Play</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> MuSE ,
+ <ulink url="x618.htm" role="AEN621">Stream</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Rezound ,
+ <ulink url="x594.htm" role="AEN609">Record and edit</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Streaming manual ,
+ <ulink url="x618.htm" role="AEN627">Stream</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Time Machine ,
+ <ulink url="x594.htm" role="AEN614">Record and edit</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Timidity ,
+ <ulink url="c534.htm#AEN544" role="AEN561">Play</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Xmms ,
+ <ulink url="c534.htm#AEN544" role="AEN551">Play</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie> Image
+ </primaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Blender ,
+ <ulink url="c632.htm" role="AEN647">Graphical software</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Gimp ,
+ <ulink url="c632.htm" role="AEN637">Graphical software</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> GQview ,
+ <ulink url="c632.htm" role="AEN653">Graphical software</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> ImageMagick ,
+ <ulink url="c632.htm" role="AEN658">Graphical software</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> InkScape ,
+ <ulink url="c632.htm" role="AEN642">Graphical software</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie> Network ,
+ <ulink url="c704.htm" role="AEN707">Communication software</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Email ,
+ <ulink url="x752.htm" role="AEN758">Email and encryption</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Links ,
+ <ulink url="c704.htm#AEN717" role="AEN727">Surf the web</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Mozilla ,
+ <ulink url="c704.htm#AEN717" role="AEN722">Surf the web</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> NVU Web page editor ,
+ <ulink url="c704.htm#AEN717" role="AEN732">Surf the web</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Samba ,
+ <ulink url="c704.htm" role="AEN712">Communication software</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Thunderbird ,
+ <ulink url="x752.htm" role="AEN768">Email and encryption</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Tor ,
+ <ulink url="c704.htm#AEN717" role="AEN743">Surf the web</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Wget Web spider ,
+ <ulink url="c704.htm#AEN717" role="AEN737">Surf the web</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie> Privacy
+ </primaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Email ,
+ <ulink url="x752.htm" role="AEN755">Email and encryption</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Enigmail ,
+ <ulink url="x752.htm" role="AEN765">Email and encryption</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Gpa ,
+ <ulink url="x752.htm" role="AEN775">Email and encryption</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Tor anonymity proxy ,
+ <ulink url="c704.htm#AEN717" role="AEN746">Surf the web</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie> Text ,
+ <ulink url="c664.htm" role="AEN667">Text software</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+ <secondaryie> AbiWord ,
+ <ulink url="c664.htm" role="AEN674">Text software</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> AntiWord ,
+ <ulink url="c664.htm" role="AEN689">Text software</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Nedit ,
+ <ulink url="c664.htm" role="AEN684">Text software</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Open Office ,
+ <ulink url="c664.htm" role="AEN700">Text software</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Scribus ,
+ <ulink url="c664.htm" role="AEN679">Text software</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie> Video ,
+ <ulink url="c403.htm" role="AEN406">Video production</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+ <secondaryie> AviDeMux ,
+ <ulink url="x487.htm" role="AEN499">Edit</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Cinelerra ,
+ <ulink url="x487.htm" role="AEN490">Edit</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie>Device setup,
+ <ulink url="c403.htm#AEN411" role="AEN413">Configure your video devices</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> EffecTV ,
+ <ulink url="x426.htm" role="AEN442">VeeJay</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> FFMpeg ,
+ <ulink url="x457.htm" role="AEN465">Play</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> FreeJ ,
+ <ulink url="x426.htm" role="AEN430">VeeJay</ulink>,
+ <ulink url="x509.htm" role="AEN521">Stream</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> HasciiCam ,
+ <ulink url="x509.htm" role="AEN529">Stream</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Kino ,
+ <ulink url="x472.htm" role="AEN479">Record</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Mencoder ,
+ <ulink url="x472.htm" role="AEN474">Record</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Mpeg4IP ,
+ <ulink url="x509.htm" role="AEN516">Stream</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Mplayer ,
+ <ulink url="x457.htm" role="AEN462">Play</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Pure Data ,
+ <ulink url="x426.htm" role="AEN451">VeeJay</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Transcode ,
+ <ulink url="x487.htm" role="AEN505">Edit</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Xaos ,
+ <ulink url="x426.htm" role="AEN446">VeeJay</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> XawTV ,
+ <ulink url="x472.htm" role="AEN483">Record</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+ <secondaryie> Xine ,
+ <ulink url="x457.htm" role="AEN459">Play</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>afrolinux,
+ <ulink url="x63.htm" role="AEN67">This is Rasta software</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>Architecture,
+ <ulink url="c1106.htm" role="AEN1111">Development tools</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>boot from harddisk,
+ <ulink url="c222.htm#AEN226" role="AEN228">Boot from harddisk</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>boot from network,
+ <ulink url="x262.htm" role="AEN264">Boot from network</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>cd,
+ <ulink url="c780.htm#AEN788" role="AEN848">Text commands</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>cfdisk,
+ <ulink url="c222.htm#AEN226" role="AEN237">Boot from harddisk</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>CLI,
+ <ulink url="c780.htm" role="AEN782">Command line console</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>Customize,
+ <ulink url="c1106.htm" role="AEN1122">Development tools</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>docking,
+ <ulink url="x185.htm" role="AEN187">Install on harddisk? Dock!</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>filesystem organization,
+ <ulink url="x138.htm" role="AEN157">Access your data volumes</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>grub,
+ <ulink url="c222.htm#AEN226" role="AEN246">Boot from harddisk</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>GUI,
+ <ulink url="c780.htm" role="AEN784">Command line console</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>license
+ </primaryie>
+ <secondaryie>copyright,
+ <ulink url="x106.htm" role="AEN108">License and disclaimer</ulink>
+ </secondaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>lilo,
+ <ulink url="c222.htm#AEN226" role="AEN255">Boot from harddisk</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>ls,
+ <ulink url="c780.htm#AEN788" role="AEN833">Text commands</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>man,
+ <ulink url="c780.htm#AEN788" role="AEN813">Text commands</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>manuals,
+ <ulink url="c26.htm#AEN45" role="AEN47">How to use this manual</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>mke3fs,
+ <ulink url="c222.htm#AEN226" role="AEN239">Boot from harddisk</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>modules,
+ <ulink url="x201.htm" role="AEN203">Extra software modules</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>nesting,
+ <ulink url="x161.htm" role="AEN163">Nest your home and settings</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>NTFS,
+ <ulink url="c116.htm" role="AEN136">Discover the system</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>partitioning,
+ <ulink url="c222.htm#AEN226" role="AEN235">Boot from harddisk</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>Programming,
+ <ulink url="c1106.htm" role="AEN1115">Development tools</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>pure:dyne,
+ <ulink url="x201.htm" role="AEN215">Extra software modules</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>rastasoft,
+ <ulink url="x63.htm" role="AEN65">This is Rasta software</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>SDK,
+ <ulink url="c1106.htm#AEN1124" role="AEN1130">Customize your dyne liveCD</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>streamtime,
+ <ulink url="x82.htm" role="AEN85">Streamtime</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>usb pendrive,
+ <ulink url="x138.htm" role="AEN146">Access your data volumes</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>Volumes,
+ <ulink url="c116.htm" role="AEN134">Discover the system</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+<indexentry>
+ <primaryie>Xfce,
+ <ulink url="c116.htm#AEN118" role="AEN121">Your desktop environment</ulink>
+ </primaryie>
+</indexentry>
+
+</index>
diff --git a/dynebolic/EN/install.sgml b/dynebolic/EN/install.sgml
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..d84e4a6
--- /dev/null
+++ b/dynebolic/EN/install.sgml
@@ -0,0 +1,544 @@
+<chapter>
+<title>Install the medialab</title>
+
+<para>
+This chapter will describe various advanced uses of the dyne:bolic
+system: how to cluster multiple computers to take advantage of shared
+resources, how to make the system resident on various computers in a
+medialab and how to keep your data safe from intrusions into your
+privacy.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+The knowledge provided by this chapter requires some basic confidence
+with GNU/Linux systems and the use of the text console terminal. It
+will empower you with the ability to flexibly setup fully operational
+medialabs even using found computers, but you need to plan well the
+architecture of your resources depending from your specific situation.
+</para>
+
+
+<section> <title>Boot from harddisk</title>
+
+<indexterm><primary>boot from harddisk</primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+
+With docking we saw that simply moving a directory in the root of a partition
+can let us boot from CD and run from harddisk. This is a very simple and safe
+way to have a dual-boot system: Cd in for dyne:bolic, CD out for anything else.
+Still some people really likes to get rid of the CD, so here it is explained how.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+Keep in mind that <emphasis>the following operation is not necessary to run dyne:bolic from harddisk</emphasis>.
+If you are not familiar with boot sectors and partition geometry you might need the
+intervention of an expert when anything goes wrong. Furthermore, in case of a mistake you
+might delete all the data stored on your harddisks and/or be left without the possibility
+to boot back into your old operating system.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+In order to boot from harddisk you need a bootloader (Lilo or Grub) installed.
+We recommend the use of Grub for its simplicity and flexibility: in fact that
+is the default bootloader dyne:bolic will install for you, but in case you have
+Lilo already installed and you don't want to change it, then there is also a way
+to add a dyne:bolic entry to it.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+The following instructions will cover various situations: you can omit some operations
+in case your computer is already setted up with them.
+
+</para>
+
+<indexterm><primary>partitioning</primary></indexterm>
+<indexterm><primary>cfdisk</primary></indexterm>
+<indexterm><primary>mke3fs</primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+
+<emphasis>In case you are installing a computer from scratch</emphasis>, without
+anything installed on it yet, then you need to partition the harddisk and format it.
+You can do so using the command <emphasis>cfdisk</emphasis> to create or
+modify your harddisk partitions, then <emphasis>mke3fs</emphasis> to format the partitions
+(or other mk* commands in case you desire to use a different filesystem than Ext3).
+<emphasis>Beware that this operation above will erase all the data on the disk</emphasis>.
+
+</para>
+
+<indexterm><primary>grub</primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+
+Once you have a disc partitioned and formatted you need to install the bootloader.
+To do this use the command <emphasis>grubconfig</emphasis> and follow the steps
+you are prompted, at the end of the process you will be able to boot your computer
+directly into dyne:bolic, without the need to use a CD.
+
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+
+<emphasis>To re-configure your bootloader</emphasis> (not necessary if
+you installed one from scratch using dyne:bolic) go look into your harddisk
+partitions, in case you have a directory boot/ see if inside there is another
+directory called grub/, if yes there you found your grub configuration, a simple text file
+called grub.conf or menu.lst which you have to edit by hand, adding a
+few lines at the bottom in order to add dyne:bolic among the boot menu
+selection:
+
+<screen>
+<userinput>
+title dyne:bolic RASTASOFT Afro Linux
+root (hd0,0) # ADJUST THIS!
+kernel /dyne/2618ck1d.krn root=/dev/ram0 rw load_ramdisk=1 max_loop=64 vga=791
+initrd /dyne/initrd.gz
+</userinput>
+</screen>
+
+After doing that you'll need to set the harddisk where you have
+docked: where it says "ADJUST THiS" change the
+<emphasis>(hd0,0)</emphasis> if necessary: hd0,1 for hda2 - hd0,2 for
+hda3 - hd1,0 for hdb1 and so on... trying wrong values is not
+dangerous and in case you are confused there is a lot more
+documentation about this process in the grub manual pages.
+
+</para>
+
+<indexterm><primary>lilo</primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+
+In case you have installed lilo, search among your harddisk partitions
+for the directory etc/ and then inside for the lilo.conf file, if
+found then add the following lines at the end of it:
+
+<screen>
+<userinput>
+
+image = /dyne/2618ck1d.krn
+ root = /dev/ram0
+ append = "max_loop=64"
+ initrd = /dyne/initrd.gz
+ label = dyne
+ read-write
+ vga = 791
+
+</userinput>
+</screen>
+
+Being sure that the /dyne directory is inside the partition
+you boot, which in lilo is configured by the
+<emphasis>boot = /dev/hd*</emphasis>
+usually at the beginning of the lilo.conf file.
+
+Please note the "image =" parameter takes a full path to
+the kernel file, which is named after it's version in a condensed form,
+for instance here 2618ck1d stands for 2.6.18-ck1-dyne .
+The condensed format is necessary for a 8.3 filename restriction of
+the isolinux CD boot system.
+</para>
+
+
+
+<para> Happy hacking ;)</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section> <title>Boot from network</title>
+
+<indexterm><primary>boot from network</primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+Network booting is supported on some personal computers: the PXE
+system was included on some BIOS already at the beginning of year 2000
+(rough estimation): if no harddisks or cd devices are found to boot,
+the first black screen of the computer will search for a PXE boot on
+the local network.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+When booting PXE looks for a DHCP server on the local network for an
+address assigned. When found it will connect via TFTP to receive the
+kernel and the ramdisk from that server or another one.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+To start a TFTP server distributing the current docked dyne:bolic system, it
+is enough to run this command in a terminal:
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>tftpd -l -s $DYNE_SYS_MNT</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+You can also configure a DHCP server to provide the network addresses
+to any PXE client booting. To do that use the graphical program
+<emphasis>gdhcpd</emphasis> starting it from a terminal, or the sample
+configuration file in /etc/dhcpd.conf. See <emphasis>man
+dhcpd</emphasis> for a reference to how to launch and operate the DHCP
+daemon.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+For more informations see <emphasis>man tftpd</emphasis> and
+<emphasis>man dhcpd</emphasis>.
+</para>
+
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>Boot from USB</title>
+
+<para>
+The following instructions explain how to make a usb storage device
+(like usb stick) bootable with grub and install dyne:bolic on it so
+that you can run it from USB, without harddisk or CD.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+If you are looking for instructions on how to save your personal data
+on a USB stick, then this is not the right place: look
+at <emphasis>Nesting</emphasis>. If you're looking to copy the entire
+system over to your harddrive, again, this is not the right place,
+look at <emphasis>Docking</emphasis>. This section documents on how to
+put the whole system on the usb stick.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+The whole system requires a USB device about the size of the /dyne
+directory (currently ~655MB at version 2.4.2) + ~30MB (for file system
+headers). Therefore, the entire system should fit on a USB stick of
+~685MB, but you may want a bit more space for your personal files. If
+your USB stick is smaller try Nesting instead.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+How DyneII loads (technical):
+
+<simplelist>
+<member>the boot system consists of a bootloader, in our case grub</member>
+<member>the bootloader loads a kernel, in our case linux :)</member>
+<member>the kernel loads a ramdisk, in our case dyne:II initrd.gz</member>
+<member>the ramdisk will look for a dyne/ dock</member>
+<member>we keep both kernel and ramdisk in a dock and install grub</member>
+</simplelist>
+
+First of all find what device your USB drive is
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>cat /proc/partitions
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+Ignore the entries that end in numbers, those are individual
+partitions on each separate device. The ones that end in letters are
+different devices: <emphasis>hda</emphasis> means your primary IDE
+harddrive, <emphasis>sda</emphasis> (or sdb sdc etc.) generally means
+a USB device (but can also mean a SCSI or SATA harddisk, be sure to
+verify this on your specific system configuration)
+</para>
+
+<para>
+If you're confused, look at the blocks column, which shows the # of
+1KB blocks on the device. If you know how big your USB stick is, you
+can find it this way. ~1,000,000 blocks = a 1 gigabyte device; ~64,000
+blocks = 64MB device. From here on this tutorial assumes your usb
+device is <emphasis>/dev/sda</emphasis>, if it's not /dev/sda, change
+it as necessary.
+</para>
+
+
+<para>Now let's prepare the partitions of the usb key: in this example
+we are using the console based cfdisk here, but you can also try to
+use Parted which is a graphical tool in MENU->FILES->Parted. Be
+careful that you selected the right device to operate on (eventually
+different from the /dev/sda in the examples below) because from now on
+the operations described will erase all data on the device.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Let's start the partition tool:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>cfdisk /dev/sda
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+Now from inside cfdisk:
+
+<simplelist>
+<member>delete all partitions</member>
+<member>create a new primary at the default maximum size</member>
+<member>set the type to 83 (Linux)</member>
+<member>Write everything and then Quit</member>
+</simplelist>
+
+Now you are ready to format your drive:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>mke2fs /dev/sda1
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+You can change the above command <emphasis>mke2fs -j</emphasis> in
+case you want to use EXT3 instead of EXT2. However, it is probably not
+advised to use the EXT3 journaled filesystem on a flash/USB device:
+journaling writes to the disk more often than necessary, which wears
+out the USB device more quickly. Use a non-journaled filesystem such
+as EXT2 (Linux only) or FAT32 (if you want to make your usb device
+readable outside of Linux). The default (ext2) is a safe choice,
+however, you may want to read up on journaled vs non-journaled file
+systems and make an informed decision in your case.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Now mount the drive:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/usb
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+And Install the bootloader (grub):
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>grubconfig
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+Select the correct usb device, generally the last item in the
+list. Note that if all the items in the list start
+with <emphasis>hda</emphasis> the computer you're currently using can't
+be booted from a usb device and you'd be installing grub to a
+partition of your harddrive instead.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Now copy the dyne/ dock directory from your current system
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>mkdir /mnt/usb/dyne
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>rsync --inplace -Pr $DYNE_SYS_MNT/* /mnt/usb/dyne/
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+Rsync is better than cp and we have a progressbar for this operation,
+which will take quite some time, depending if you have a USB 1.0 or
+2.0 connection.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+It should be all ready at this point, so try booting your USB device
+on a computer which supports USB booting. If it works, great! If not,
+open your /boot/grub/menu.lst (on the USB device) and change the
+root(...) line from (hd0,0) to (hd1,0).
+</para>
+
+
+
+</section>
+
+
+
+<section>
+<title>Cluster computer farms</title>
+
+<para>
+Since version 2, dyne:bolic changes its approach to clustering
+implementing a "human driven" suite of tools that let you control
+various applications running on multiple computers connected to
+your network.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+In situations where you have many old computers you can use one for
+each task and control all of them from the same keyboard and mouse.
+The desktops of the computers can be visualized on your own screen or
+on multiple screens in case you have monitors attached to each of
+them. Powerful workstations can be combined using multiple processing
+units and their displays can be tiled together to compose a unique
+wide desktop.
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+This way to operate dyne:bolic computers involves different kinds of
+applications offering a flexible setup that you can customize to your
+needs. This part of the manual will just make you familiar with the
+tools and you'll need to refer to their manuals to discover all the
+potential.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+To connect multiple computers you should first make sure you can reach
+them over the network and you know their addresses. A simple way to do
+it that will work on every GNU/Linux system is using the
+command <emphasis>ifconfig</emphasis> on each computer to print out
+the currently configured network address:
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>ifconfig | grep inet
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+then edit your <emphasis>/etc/hosts</emphasis> file with the full list
+of addresses and a name for them that you can choose. Copying the /etc/hosts file on all involved machines will make them aware of each other "hostnames".
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+<emphasis>Synergy</emphasis> is a powerful tool that lets your
+keyboard and mouse control different desktops accessed simply moving
+the mouse out of the current screen into theirs. An example
+configuration file is provided
+in <emphasis>/etc/synergy.conf</emphasis> and it must be modified
+with the hostnames of your computers (to be associated to IP numeric
+addresses in /etc/hosts).
+
+
+<para>
+The main computer where the keyboard and mouse are attached should run
+the command:
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>synergys -n hostname -c /etc/synergy.conf
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+All the other computers to be connected should run this command,
+making sure the config file include them in the setup:
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>synergyc -n hostname -c /etc/synergy.conf
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+</para>
+
+<para>
+<emphasis>VNC</emphasis> is a remote video client that lets you
+control the desktop of another computer on your network as inside a
+window on your current desktop. It can be also used to interact with
+two mouse and keyboard at the same time.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+To share the desktop of a computer for an incoming VNC connection just
+run:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>x11vnc
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+To connect to a computer sharing the VNC desktop:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>vncviewer computer
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+For more informations on VNC see <emphasis>man x11vnc</emphasis> and
+<emphasis>man vncviewer</emphasis>.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+<emphasis>Remote X</emphasis> execution lets you run an application on
+another computer and control it on your desktop, as if it would be
+running locally.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+In order to authorize other computers to open applications on your
+desktop you must first run the command:
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>xhost +computer
+</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+Then Click the network button on the top-right panel and
+run <emphasis>Exec_X11</emphasis>, fill in your user account (default
+is user:root password:luther) and write the command to start the application.
+</para>
+
+
+</section>
+
+
+
+
+<section>
+<title>Keep your data safe</title>
+
+<para>
+Dyne:bolic is developed with your privacy in mind: as mentioned before
+the NEST can be encrypted to make your private data unaccessible
+unless your password is provided, now we'll proceed to analize in deep
+all the aspects of this security measure.
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+When an encrypted nest is created, every file you place in your home
+directory will be preserved in a scrambled form using a
+Rijndael/SHA256 algorithm: such a cypher can be considered very
+secure, maybe some military organizations are able to break it, but
+anyway that would be very expensive in terms of resources employed.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Dyne:bolic encryption mechanism employes a passfile "dyne.nst.gpg"
+which contains the cypher used to protect your data: that file holds
+the password that, matched together with your dyne.nst file, can
+access all the data you store in your nest. So actually that file is
+very precious for your privacy, you should be careful and not copy it
+around.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Since the passfile is so delicate, it is also protected with a
+password: the one you choose at the beginning, which is used to
+scramble the passfile through a CAT5 algorithm. Keep in mind that this
+cypher algorithm is weak and eventually, in case an intruder takes
+possession of your .gpg passfile, it will be easy to crack.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Now in practical terms all this encryption scheme means that you can
+safely move around your dyne.nst file separated from the dyne.nst.gpg
+passfile: there will be no intrusion in the data stored inside even in
+case you loose it. It also means that you can give your passfile to a
+friend, still protected by the password you memorized, so that neither
+you nor your friend will be able to access the nest until you meet up
+again. More in general, this scheme lets you separate your encrypted
+data from the passfile, still keeping everything sealed by the
+password you keep in mind, and move the data around in different
+places being sure meanwhile it's not accessed by anyone else.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+So for sure we can say our privacy protection is way above the usual
+schemes used in most common operating systems, which keep your data in
+clear and physically accessible.
+ </para>
+
+<para>
+In case you are involved in some mission critical task and you are
+facing the possibility of imprisonment and torture, you should take a
+bit more care. A good practice would be to customize a bit the startup
+scripts of dyne:bolic to have a false password prompt, the
+/lib/dyne/nest.sh script is a good start. Another way can be to have
+an encrypted nest for which you would disclose the password if forced
+to, but then also another encrypted file hidden somewhere that is not
+prompting for a password at every boot.
+</para>
+
+
+
+</section>
+
+</chapter>
diff --git a/dynebolic/EN/intro.sgml b/dynebolic/EN/intro.sgml
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..b16f7c9
--- /dev/null
+++ b/dynebolic/EN/intro.sgml
@@ -0,0 +1,373 @@
+
+<chapter>
+<title>The hacktive media</title>
+
+<para>
+dyne:bolic GNU/Linux is a live bootable distribution working
+<emphasis>directly from the CD without the need to install</emphasis>
+or change anything on harddisk. It can recognize most of your hardware devices and offers a
+vast range of softwares for sound and video production, streaming, 3d
+modeling, peer to peer and filesharing, deejaying, veejaying and more.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+This operating system focuses on providing <emphasis>multimedia functionalities</emphasis>
+to surf, stream, record, edit, encode and broadcast both sound and video;
+it also overcomes usual installation problems by providing an easy way
+to <emphasis>run from harddisk without repartitioning</emphasis>, but just copying
+a directory (<emphasis>docking</emphasis>), thus avoiding any risk of data loss and preserving the integrity
+of other systems you are already using.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+dyne:bolic it is made by and shaped on the needs of media activists,
+artists and creatives to stimulate the production and not only the
+fruition of digital and analog informations.
+Empowered by GNU/Linux and the groovy open source software community,
+this operating system takes birth as a grassroot effort to spread free
+software and the spirit of sharing informations.
+</para>
+
+<mediaobject>
+ <imageobject>
+ <imagedata align="center" fileref="images/shot-support" format="jpg">
+ </imageobject>
+</mediaobject>
+
+<para>
+The latest version of this document is made available online at the address
+<ulink url="http://dynebolic.org/manual">dynebolic.org/manual</ulink> and in
+printable format at <ulink url="http://dynebolic.org/dynebolic-manual.pdf">
+dynebolic.org/dynebolic-manual.pdf</ulink>.
+For more informations visit the homepage on <ulink url="http://dynebolic.org">dynebolic.org</ulink>
+where more online documentation is made available.
+To contribute you can <ulink url="http://bugs.dyne.org">report bugs</ulink> and
+get in touch with the community of users and developers joining the
+the <ulink url="http://lists.dyne.org">discussion mailinglists</ulink> or the
+ <emphasis>irc.freenode.net #dyne</emphasis> chat channel.
+</para>
+
+
+<section>
+<title>How to use this manual</title>
+
+<indexterm><primary>manuals</primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+Far from being complete in exploring the possibilities of each
+single software, you'll get introduced and find basic directions on
+how to use, modify and employ dynebolic in various circumstances.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+When in need of in-deep information on how to operate a particular
+software, you should consult the included <emphasis>man pages</emphasis>.
+
+<para>
+The manpage is the name of the manual page describing usage of the
+program, you can use it with the <emphasis>man</emphasis> command from
+an <emphasis>XTerminal</emphasis> inside dyne:bolic :
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>man hasciicam</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+it will show an higly informative text about the usage of the program;
+the manpage name usually matches the name of the program executable
+itself.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Always keep in mind: the <emphasis>man</emphasis> command is your
+friend :) it works in every GNU/Linux system providing information
+about every command, and with all the commands that are around there
+is a lot to discover! for example have a look at manuals like "sox"
+or "convert", you'll find out that you can do a lot of things just
+from the XTerminal commandline!
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+At last, in case you are using intensively a certain software for
+your purposes, don't miss to consult its own documentation and join
+the community of users around it: there you can discover more about its
+usage and development.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>This is Rasta software</title>
+
+<indexterm><primary>rastasoft</primary></indexterm>
+<indexterm><primary>afrolinux</primary></indexterm>
+
+<mediaobject>
+ <imageobject>
+ <imagedata align="center" fileref="images/shot-credits" format="jpg">
+ </imageobject>
+</mediaobject>
+
+
+ <para> Jah Rastafari Livity
+bless our Freedom! This is free software, share it for the good of
+yourself and your people, respect others and let them express, be free
+and let others be free. Live long and prosper in Peace!
+</para>
+
+<para>
+But, no Peace without Justice.
+This software is about Resistance inna babylon world which tries to control
+more and more the way we communicate and we share informations and knowledge.
+This software is for all those who cannot afford to have the latest expensive
+hardware to speak out their words of consciousness and good will.
+This software has a full range of applications for production and not only
+fruition of information, it's a full multimedia studio, you don't need to buy
+anything to express your voice.
+Freedom and sharing of knowledge are solid principles for evolution and that's
+where this software comes from.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Inna babylon, money is the main requirement to make a voice possible to
+be heard by others. Capitalist and fundamentalist governments all around
+the world rule with huge TV monopolies spreading their propaganda,
+silencing all criticism.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+This is a struggle for Redemption from existing operating systems
+which always require new expensive hardware for doing the same as
+ever: give us free players but make us pay for producing our own
+voices. And the one who protects you rips you off, as the Arabs say.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Dyne:bolic is a tool to produce and publish yourself, freely.
+There is nothing to consume here, there is all you need to create.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+Commercial operating systems always give a possibility to listen - all
+kinds of "free to download" players, but always with restrictions and
+no easy way for everybody to speak out.
+
+The way communication is structured follows the hierarchy of powers
+allready established in babylon's mediascapes and, worst than ever,
+money is the main requirement to spread a voice and let it be heard by
+others.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+Neverthless, proprietary software spreads the dependence from business
+companies thru the populace: whenever we share our knowledge on how to
+use a certain software, we make the people in need to buy the tools
+from merchants in order to express their creativity. This is great
+responsability for anyone of us who teaches somebody how to do
+something with software: the need to buy will be slavery under the
+merchantile interests of capitalism.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+The roots of Rasta culture can be found in Resistance to slavery.
+This software is not a business. This software is free as of speech
+and is one step in the struggle for Redemption and Freedom. This
+software is dedicated to the memory of Patrice Lumumba, Marcus Garvey,
+Marthin Luther King, Steve Biko, Walter Rodney, Malcom X; in
+solidarity with Mumia Abu Jamal and all those who still resist to
+slavery, racism and oppression, who still fight imperialism and seek
+an alternative to the hegemony of capitalism in our World.
+
+ </para>
+
+<para>
+<ulink url="http://rastasoft.org">Hic Sunt Leones</ulink>.
+And Much Blessings in Jah Luv to All Those who still Resist.
+Selah.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>Streamtime</title>
+<subtitle>Employing dyne:bolic for the freedom of communication</subtitle>
+
+<indexterm><primary>streamtime</primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+
+<ulink url="http://www.streamtime.org">Streamtime</ulink> is a project
+of <emphasis>Radio Reedflute</emphasis> in collaboration with
+<emphasis>Rastasoft</emphasis>, developed with artists and activists
+from Iraq and elsewhere. Streamtime is a loose network of media
+activists dedicated to assist autonomous networking. Streamtime uses
+old and new media for the production of content and networks in the
+fields of media, arts, culture and activism in crisis areas, like
+Iraq.
+
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+
+We imagine improvised expressive devices like a CD that turns your PC
+into an on line streaming studio. Imagine a mob that creates a traffic
+jam. Think of the religious policeman in London, the konfused kollege
+kid and the jealous dentist in Baghdad and the jailed blogger blogging
+on in Cairo. Building autonomous networks in extreme conditions.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+Streamtime uses old and new media for the production of content and
+networks in the fields of media, arts, culture and activism in crisis
+areas, like Iraq. Streamtime offers a diffuse environment for
+developing do-it-yourself media. We focus on a cultural sense of
+finding your own way in the quagmire that is Iraq, and its
+representation in the global media. We should not try to change
+politics in order to foster cultural change; we should support
+cultural manifestation in order to force political change.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+Streamtime may take the form of a campaign, a work of collaborative
+art, a current of unheard sounds, unspeakable words and unseen
+imaginations.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Remote interaction and ubiquitous dialogues, dematerialized
+communication and participation on the streets. Space in its
+territorial, acoustic and cybernetic dimensions is fragmented and
+recomposed realtime. Hacking codes both moral and digital, forming
+new maps, mutant drawings and unstable skins. Information overload
+can be abandoned in favor of consciousness and collaborative
+practices. Memory has a digital, diverse, horizontal voice.
+
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>Privacy and freedom of expression</title>
+
+<para>
+The distinction between what is public and what is private is becoming
+more and more blurred with the increasing intrusiveness of the media
+and advances in electronic technology. While this distinction is
+always the outcome of continuous cultural negotiation, it continues to
+be critical, for where nothing is private, democracy becomes
+impossible
+<footnote><para>quote from Privacy Conference, Social Research, New
+School University</para></footnote>
+</para>
+
+<para>
+The internet offers plenty of free services, on the wave of the Web2.0
+fuzz and the community boom, while all private informations are hosted
+on servers owned by global corporations and monopolies.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+We urge you to reflect on the importance of keeping privacy for
+personal data. Our present world is full of prevarication and
+political imprisonments, war rages in several places and media is
+mainly used for propaganda by the powers in charge. Some of us face
+the dangers of being tracked by oppressors opposing our self
+definition, independent thinking and resistance to omologation.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+People have the right to protect their privacy as much as their
+freedom to express.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+It is important to keep in mind that noone else than *you* can ensure
+the privacy of your personal data. Server hosted services and web
+integrated technologies gather all data into huge information pools
+that are made available to established economical and cultural
+regimes.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Since version 2.4 in this free operating system was introduced support
+for strong encryption of your /home private data with Linux dm-crypt
+i586 optimized Rijndael hashed SHA256, to provide an efficient and
+user-friendly tool to protect your bookmarks, addressbook, documents
+and emails by carrying them back with you, protected with a fairly
+strong cryptographic algorithm. </para>
+
+<para>
+A passkey to read your data is stored inside a file, which is also
+protected by a password. It is possible to keep everything with you on
+a small usb stick, still being sure that the data won't be easily
+recovered in case you loose it. You can also give the passkey
+protecting your data to a friend, to make the data unaccessible until
+you meet again, which can be useful in case of tricky transports.
+You'll find more informations in the following sections about nesting
+and privacy.</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>License and disclaimer</title>
+
+<indexterm><primary>license</primary><secondary>copyright</secondary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+The dyne user's manual is
+copyright (c) 2003 - 2008 Denis Jaromil Rojo
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+Thanks for reviewing and inspirations go to the Streamtime crew, all
+the bloggers from Baghdad and any other crazy place in the world where
+people like us happens to be living, has to live it, and can even find
+a way to survive.
+
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
+under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2
+or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation;
+with the Introductory and Colophon sections being invariant, with the
+Front-Cover and Back-Cover Texts clearly stating authorship and
+copyright notices.
+You should have received a copy of the GNU Free Documentation License
+along with this manual; if not, write to the Free Software
+Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA
+</para>
+
+<para>
+dyne:bolic GNU/Linux is
+copyright (C) 2001 - 2008 Denis Jaromil Rojo
+</para>
+<para>
+Dyne:bolic is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
+it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
+the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
+(at your option) any later version.
+This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
+but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
+MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
+GNU General Public License for more details.
+
+You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
+along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
+Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA
+</para>
+</section>
+
+</chapter>
diff --git a/dynebolic/EN/network.sgml b/dynebolic/EN/network.sgml
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..f60db41
--- /dev/null
+++ b/dynebolic/EN/network.sgml
@@ -0,0 +1,199 @@
+<chapter>
+<title>Communication software</title>
+<subtitle>Communication software included in dyne:bolic</subtitle>
+<indexterm><primary> Network </primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+Since their birth, UNIX systems have been specially enhanced for
+network tasks, to efficiently handle communication protocols connecting
+computers across the net and of course the Internet.
+Being a GNU/Linux system, dyne:bolic offers a vast range of possibilities
+and applications, from the simpliest to the most advanced network software.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+As a practical tool for media hacktivism, dyne:bolic emphasizes on
+protecting the privacy of the users, providing an anonymizing proxy
+and email encryption tools ready for use.
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Network </primary>
+<secondary> Samba </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+The <emphasis>Samba</emphasis> filesharing daemon runs by default on
+dyne:bolic, sharing in read-only the currently running system on the
+local network to make it available for network installing. If you want
+to share other directories you'll need to tweak by hand the
+configuration file in <emphasis>/etc/samba</emphasis> </para>
+
+<!--
+<para>
+Our dyne:bolic distribution gives you a full range of programs to
+cover most of the ways to comunicate wich are commonly used today,
+protects your privacy with encryption whenever it is possible, offers
+peer to peer and filesharing tools working both on local and remote
+networks, lets you share desktop between two computers and more...
+</para>
+-->
+
+<section>
+<title>Surf the web</title>
+<subtitle>software to access the world wide web</subtitle>
+
+<para>
+
+There are three different ways to access the WWW pages on the net using
+dyne:bolic, thanks to the variety of web browsers developed for the
+GNU/Linux platform.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Network </primary>
+<secondary> Mozilla </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+The first and most familiar browser is <emphasis>Firefox</emphasis> which
+is developed by the Mozilla team in order to have a fully capable tool to
+access the web. Firefox offers an intuitive interface, bookmark handling
+and a couple of plugins that can be used to extend its functionalities.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Network </primary>
+<secondary> Links </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+Then we have <emphasis>Links</emphasis> which is a lightweight alternative
+to the previous: it runs much faster on old computers while still offering
+most of the crucial functionalities. It is remarkable its quality and speed
+in rendering web pages, making it a great tool for presentations.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Network </primary>
+<secondary> NVU Web page editor </secondary></indexterm>
+
+In order to edit webpages, <emphasis>Nvu</emphasis> is provided for
+web designers, which provides a powerful WYSIWYG environment that is
+fully integrated with the Firefox/Mozilla standards of webpages. It is
+a user-friendly tool that you'll find available also for many other
+platforms and operating systems, so it's worth a little effort to
+learn how to use it, then you can have your homepage ready in minutes.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Network </primary>
+<secondary> Wget Web spider </secondary></indexterm>
+
+A powerful "spider" is also included to crawl and download entire
+websites: <emphasis>WGet</emphasis>, which is a commandline tool. As
+usual you can discover how it works by consulting its manual from an
+XTerminal, typing <emphasis>man wget</emphasis>.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm>
+<primary> Network </primary>
+<secondary> Tor </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<indexterm>
+<primary> Privacy </primary>
+<secondary> Tor anonymity proxy </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+For better privacy and anomymity when browsing, but also to weed out
+often annoying advertisements and popups, a proxy can be configured to
+run by default: <emphasis>Tor</emphasis> can be configured for use in
+each browser to make all internet connections completely anonymous and
+not traceable.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+To enable this feature have a look at
+the <emphasis>dyne.cfg</emphasis> in your DOCK and add "tor" in the
+list of daemons to be started at boot.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>Email and encryption</title>
+<subtitle>Send your letters in a safe way</subtitle>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Privacy </primary>
+<secondary> Email </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Network </primary>
+<secondary> Email </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<para>
+Email is nowadays the most widespread technology used for personal
+communication on the net. Alltough it is often not secured for privacy
+and it is being easily intercepted by all kind of third parties:
+to enforce governmental control, market surveys and spionage.
+If you are concerned about privacy then you probably allready heard
+about the solution to secure email communication:
+<emphasis>encryption</emphasis>.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Encryption is a technique based on mathematical formulas, it can ensure
+security in your communication by using two keys: a private and a public
+one, you will give the public to your friends while keep the private one to
+decypher the messages you receive - everyone wanting to send you a secure
+message will need to use your public key to encrypt it and only your private
+key will be able to decrypt it.
+For more information on its usage and implementation refer to the web pages
+on <ulink url="http://www.gnupg.org"></ulink>
+</para>
+
+
+<indexterm><primary> Privacy </primary>
+<secondary> Enigmail </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Network </primary>
+<secondary> Thunderbird </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<para>
+
+Dyne:bolic comes equipped with a popular email program:
+<emphasis>Thunderbird</emphasis> which can handle local downloading of
+mailbox, filters, folders and multiple accounts. It can be integrated
+with the <emphasis>GnuPG encryption</emphasis> system installing a
+plugin extension called <emphasis>Enigmail</emphasis>.
+
+</para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Privacy </primary>
+<secondary> Gpa </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<para>
+Also included is <emphasis>GPA</emphasis> the GNU Privacy Assistant which
+will help you in the task of generating your encryption keys and handling
+the collection of your friends keys into a local keyring.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+
+</chapter>
diff --git a/dynebolic/EN/system.sgml b/dynebolic/EN/system.sgml
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..a658e11
--- /dev/null
+++ b/dynebolic/EN/system.sgml
@@ -0,0 +1,346 @@
+<chapter>
+<title>Discover the system</title>
+
+<section>
+<title>Your desktop environment</title>
+
+
+<para>
+Dyne:bolic doesn't requires to install anything on your harddisks,
+which can be left untouched while the system is used. Still, depending
+from your preferred way to operate, it can boot from harddisk, CD, USB
+or network (explained the following chapter) and it can store data in
+a single file that can be transported across different media. The
+whole operating system fits on a single CD, to run it from harddisk
+you just need to copy the DYNE directory in it (see docking), while in
+a diskless thin-client setup that can also be mounted via network.
+This makes dyne:bolic very easy to be employed and mantained, while
+there is no risk for misconfiguration: the system comes as it is,
+providing a slick desktop full of applications ready to use. </para>
+
+<indexterm><primary>Xfce</primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+The default desktop manager is <ulink
+url="http://www.xfce.org">Xfce</ulink>, it offers you multiple
+desktops (try ctrl+F2 and other numbers) and a menu that you can
+recall by clicking the right mouse button on the background. On the
+upper right corner you have your storage devices which you can access
+with a click. </para>
+
+<para>
+Inside the application menu software is organized by tasks, so you can
+easily find your way to play, record, edit and stream both audio and
+video, communicate and publish text, webpages, 3d animations and much
+more. </para>
+
+<para>
+Click on <emphasis>CONFIGURE</emphasis> in your menu to access system
+configuration facilities and customize your system. </para>
+
+<mediaobject>
+ <imageobject>
+ <imagedata align="center" fileref="images/shot-configure" format="jpg">
+ </imageobject>
+</mediaobject>
+
+
+<para>
+To be introduced to various desktop functionalities you can visit
+<ulink url="http://spot.river-styx.com/viewarticle.php?id=8">Spot's
+homepage</ulink> and read the <ulink
+url="http://www.osnews.com/story.php?news_id=6490">OSNews dyne:bolic
+review</ulink>. </para>
+
+</section>
+
+<indexterm><primary>Volumes</primary></indexterm>
+<indexterm><primary>NTFS</primary></indexterm>
+
+<section>
+<title>Access your data volumes</title>
+
+
+<mediaobject>
+ <imageobject>
+ <imagedata align="center" fileref="images/shot-volumes" format="jpg">
+ </imageobject>
+</mediaobject>
+
+
+<para>
+
+You can easily access your files on connected storage devices
+(harddisks, cd, floppy, usb) using the buttons in the upper right
+corner of your desktop, as well your local network shares and remote
+internet accounts. Your partitions are automatically mounted in the
+<emphasis>/mnt</emphasis> directory, which you see linked in your home
+as <emphasis>Volumes</emphasis>. You can read and write on all your
+volumes except for NT filesystems, which you can only read.
+
+</para>
+
+<indexterm><primary>usb pendrive</primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+Usb storage devices (like usb pens, smartcards and some digital photo
+cameras) can be opened simply with a double click on the usb symbol.
+But beware that sometimes unusual partition schemes can confuse the
+autodetection, so you can try by hand in a Xterminal issuing manual
+commands:
+
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ # </prompt><userinput>mount /dev/sdXY /mnt/usb</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+
+Where you must substitute X with letters (a,b,c...) and Y with numbers
+(1,2,3) for example <emphasis>/dev/sda2</emphasis>.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+If you have only one cdrom or dvd player on your computer
+with <emphasis>docking</emphasis> you can have it free for
+use after booting dyne:bolic (see following chapter about DOCKING),
+then you can access, browse, play and rip compact discs and dvd.
+</para>
+
+<indexterm><primary>filesystem organization</primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+To have a general overview about the organization of various directories you find in GNU/Linux systems,
+read the manual <emphasis>hier</emphasis> (type "man hier" in the Xterminal).
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+
+
+<section>
+<title>Nest your home and settings</title>
+
+<indexterm><primary>nesting</primary></indexterm>
+
+
+<mediaobject>
+ <imageobject>
+ <imagedata align="center" fileref="images/shot-nest-main" format="jpg">
+ </imageobject>
+</mediaobject>
+
+
+
+<para>
+By default your <emphasis>/home, /etc and /var</emphasis> directories
+reside in RAM memory: every file and configuration you save will not
+be there again at the next boot.
+
+To save your home and settings permanently you need to create a
+<emphasis>NEST</emphasis>: it is just a file called "dyne.nst" that
+can be placed on a harddisk or usb storage device and it loaded at
+every boot. You just need to create your nest once, dyne:bolic looks
+for it at every startup and if it is present starts using it
+automatically. </para>
+
+
+<para>
+The <emphasis>nesting</emphasis> function is very practical to keep
+all the modifications you make to the system while using it (settings,
+saved files, accounts, language, private data etc.) and transport or
+backup them. For example, in case you nest on your USB stick, you can
+boot with it connected at startup, then that nest will be used and all
+your /home and settings will always stay with you, in your personal
+USB stick. This way you don't even need a laptop to travel around with
+your software environment and data, just carry a dyne:bolic CD and
+your nested USB stick with you, wherever you'll be able to boot it
+you'll have your /home. </para>
+
+<para>
+<emphasis>How to create a nest?</emphasis> at the boot screen or in
+your <emphasis>Home</emphasis>, click on the
+<emphasis>Configure</emphasis> button, then choose
+<emphasis>Nest</emphasis> (the little icon of a duck). You will be
+prompted to create a nest on your harddisk or USB stick, proceed
+choosing the partition you want and how big you need it: good sizes
+may vary between 250 and 500 megabytes, depending from how much you
+plan to use the system, modify it and open it for other users.
+</para>
+
+
+<mediaobject>
+ <imageobject>
+ <imagedata align="center" fileref="images/shot-nest-hd" format="jpg">
+ </imageobject>
+</mediaobject>
+
+
+<para>
+Since version 2.4 when creating a nest you'll also see a padlock
+button: press it and your new nest will be secured with encryption,
+you'll be asked to set a password, which will be then asked at every
+boot when you mount the nest. Without that password it will be very
+hard to access your nest, so you'll be granted with fairly good
+security for your personal data.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+If you nest on harddisk, the supported partition formats are: Dos,
+Fat32, Ext2, ReiserFS, Beos (BeFS), and NTFS (supported since version
+2.5). The nest is just one file created in the /dyne directory at the
+root of your partition (C:\ or D:\ in the DOS filesystem) called
+<emphasis>dyne.nst</emphasis>. To erase a nest simply delete that file.
+
+<para>
+Since version 2.5 it is also possible to mount nests after boot: just
+plug in your usb stick and navigate the content of the dyne/
+directory, a double click on the dyne.nst (the duck icon) will mount
+your home and prompt for a password if it is encrypted.
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+
+<title>Install on harddisk? Dock!</title>
+<indexterm><primary>docking</primary></indexterm>
+
+
+<mediaobject>
+ <imageobject>
+ <imagedata align="center" fileref="images/shot-dock" format="jpg">
+ </imageobject>
+</mediaobject>
+
+<para>
+
+Dyne:bolic solves the problem of istallation in a very simple way:
+there is no installation :) you simply copy a directory and this is
+called "docking".
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+Docking lets you run the system from an harddisk, with shorter load
+time and more speed. With a dock you can also boot from floppy, or
+from a multi-boot partition.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+Docking consists of copying the dyne/ directory from the CD to the
+harddisk. You don't need to change anything in your partition, just
+copy a directory into it: drag the dyne/ folder from the CD on the
+icon of your harddisk, that's it! It will occupy less than 700
+megabytes of space.
+
+After 'docking', you can boot with the CD inside and it will eject
+automatically after the first phase of the boot process, this is the
+sign the dock went well! Like that, even without the need for
+repartitioning or configuring a double boot, you can just switch to
+dyne:bolic using a CD or a floppy, but still run it from harddisk at
+full speed, like an installed operating system - and even better! ;)
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+Of course when you want to remove the dock is easy: just delete the
+/dyne directory in your harddisk!
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+Remember that docking is different from nesting:
+<emphasis>Docking</emphasis> is done to run the system and all
+application from harddisk instead of CD, <emphasis>nesting</emphasis>
+is to store your home and settings in a single file on harddisk or usb
+storage.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+More online information about docking is available on the <ulink
+url="http://lab.dyne.org/Docking">wiki community pages</ulink>.
+
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+
+<section>
+<title>Extra software modules</title>
+
+<indexterm><primary>modules</primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+
+Dyne:II offers the possibility to be expanded
+using <emphasis>.dyne</emphasis> modules: collections of applications
+that can be easily installed and used. In fact the basic system
+already contains some of these modules, that can be found in your dock
+as the <emphasis>dyne/modules/</emphasis> directory.
+
+From the menu, you can see them clicking thru <emphasis>CONFIGURE ->
+DYNE -> MODULES</emphasis>
+
+</para>
+
+<mediaobject>
+ <imageobject>
+ <imagedata align="center" fileref="images/shot-modules" format="jpg">
+ </imageobject>
+</mediaobject>
+
+<para>
+
+Additional dyne modules are available online on the dynebolic.org
+homepage in the <emphasis>Extras</emphasis> section. Download and
+activate them just dropping the .dyne files into the
+dyne/modules docked directory. Then reboot, that's it!
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+Users can easily keep their modules across different machines, always
+finding back the software they need. Modules can also be used thru
+different dyne versions: just update the core dock and then drop in
+your good old modules.
+
+</para>
+
+<indexterm><primary>pure:dyne</primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+Download free and open source dyne modules online from
+<ulink url="ftp://ftp.dyne.org/dynebolic/modules"</ulink>, there are
+many interesting extensions already: office and development tools,
+crosscompile chains, manuals and of course games :)
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Quite some developers and artists are actively contributing with
+modules listed
+on <ulink url="http://lab.dyne.org/DyneModules"></ulink>.
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+
+When you install new modules, since it is so easy, the only care that
+must be taken is their provenience, since a broken or malicious module
+can access all your system. Of course to install a module you must be
+root. On our website we'll suggest only modules we have tested, anyway
+you're free to choose, it's all up to you to decide whom you trust,
+you just did it by running this system on your computer didn't you? :)
+
+</para>
+
+
+</section>
+
+</chapter>
diff --git a/dynebolic/EN/text.sgml b/dynebolic/EN/text.sgml
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..1152fd6
--- /dev/null
+++ b/dynebolic/EN/text.sgml
@@ -0,0 +1,104 @@
+<chapter>
+
+
+<title>Text software</title>
+<subtitle>Text editing and publishing with dyne:bolic</subtitle>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Text </primary></indexterm>
+
+<para>
+
+Dyne:bolic includes software to let you easily write and compose
+any kind of text document: hyper-texts that can be published on
+the internet (HTML), formatted texts that can be printed (RTF,
+PDF, Postscript and even the deprecated DOC
+
+<footnote><para>
+You shouldn't use the .DOC format for many reasons: it exposes
+all your previous changes in your documents which can often lead to
+a privacy problem, it can vehicle dangerous viruses that affect other
+proprietary systems and it stores your text in a non-readable way
+which ties you up to the availability of proprietary software.
+See the extensive document <ulink url="http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/no-word-attachments.html"></ulink>
+on the topic. However, dyne:bolic is able to read and write all .DOC files.
+</para></footnote>
+
+format).
+</para>
+
+<para>
+<indexterm><primary> Text </primary>
+<secondary> AbiWord </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+AbiWord is rapidly becoming a state of the art Word Processor, with
+lots of features useful for your daily work, personal needs, or for
+just some good old typing fun. It is able to read and write all
+industry standard document types, such as OpenOffice.org documents,
+Microsoft Word documents, WordPerfect documents, Rich Text Format
+documents, HTML web pages and many more.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Text </primary>
+<secondary> Scribus </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>Scribus</emphasis> is a desktop publishing program to
+compose vectorial formats like PDF and Postscript, it is useful
+to paginate text in a professional printable form to produce
+magazines, flyers and most publications that need to mix text and
+images in pages following customizable schemes.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Text </primary>
+<secondary> Nedit </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>Nedit</emphasis> is a plain text editor providing syntax
+highlight for a couple of sourcecode languages, it is intuitive and
+easy to use for the newbies, but at the same can offer a powerful
+environment for programmers.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Text </primary>
+<secondary> AntiWord </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+At last, <emphasis>Antiword</emphasis> is a very handy commandline
+application to convert with a simple command any .doc file into a
+plain text file, keeping the alignement of the lines intact.
+For a quick start try it out:
+<screen>
+<prompt>[d:b] ~ #</prompt><userinput>antiword evil.doc > good.txt</userinput> <lineannotation><keycap>[Enter]</keycap></lineannotation>
+</screen>
+as usual there are manual pages providing more informations on its usage,
+just type <emphasis>man antiword</emphasis> into a terminal.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Text </primary>
+<secondary> Open Office </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+In case you need a full blown office suite to satisfy your needs here,
+there is an <emphasis>Open Office 2.0</emphasis> dyne module available
+online for download from our website, you can place it into your Dock
+modules directory ( dyne/modules/ ) and at next reboot you'll find it
+in the application menu. With Open Office you can read and write all
+.DOC files, .XLS spreadsheets, .PPT presentations and more.
+
+</para>
+
+</chapter>
diff --git a/dynebolic/EN/video.sgml b/dynebolic/EN/video.sgml
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..fc72044
--- /dev/null
+++ b/dynebolic/EN/video.sgml
@@ -0,0 +1,399 @@
+<chapter>
+<title>Video production</title>
+<subtitle>Play, record, edit and stream your video</subtitle>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<para>
+
+The GNU/Linux platform nowadays offers an interesting range of tools
+for video production, editing and manipulation; you can play all kind
+of video files and DVDs, but also encode them for distribution and
+switch between formats. Furthermore, you'll find software for
+recording, veejaying and streaming, non-linear editing and subtitling.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+However, you should consider that most of the video tools running on
+GNU/Linux platform are in development: indeed you can help much in
+testing and reporting the bugs you encounter, that's how anyone can
+help free software to grow better and better, as it does.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Now lets proceed on how to configure an available video device and then
+browse thru the video software included in dyne:bolic,
+following a subdivision in task categories.
+</para>
+
+<section>
+<title>Configure your video devices</title>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary>Device setup</secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<para>
+There are various devices that can be used on PC computers in order to
+have video input: USB webcams and capture cards, PCI TV cards,
+Firewire and even parallel port. They all have different chipsets and
+manufacturers and need different Linux device drivers.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+Dyne:bolic is capable to automaticly recognize most PCI (internal) TV
+cards at boot time (WinTV, BTTV) and now also USB webcams as well
+Firewire controllers: they will all be initialized at boot and can be
+accessed from the video device <emphasis>/dev/video0</emphasis> or
+subsequent numbers (video1, video2 ..) in case you have more than one.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+If your video device is not recognized automatically (the /dev/video
+doesn't exists) then you need to configure it by hand. In case of USB
+webcams, if your is not recognized automatically a good place to look
+for hints is <ulink url="http://www.linux-usb.org">the linux-usb
+website</ulink>.
+
+Also the <ulink
+url="http://spot.river-styx.com/viewarticle.php?id=16"> Spot's guide
+about rolling your camera </ulink> is a good place to visit for more
+informations on how to proceed.
+</para>
+
+
+<para>
+
+ If the online documentation says your device is supported by a
+particular kernel driver, you can try to load it using the command
+'<emphasis>modprobe modulename</emphasis>' and see if everything went
+well by looking in the last lines of the messages printed out by the
+<emphasis>dmesg</emphasis> command.
+
+Many modules are already present in dyne:bolic, but some might require
+to be compiled using the kernel sources, which is a more complicated
+process that can't be explained here: you'll need to find more
+instructions online about how to do it and download the dyne:II kernel
+sources using <emphasis>dyneSDK</emphasis> (see the DEVELOPMENT
+chapter about it).
+
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>VeeJay</title>
+
+<para>
+
+The VeeJay applications implement a pioneeristical approach to video
+manipulation in realtime, taking advantage of the high computational
+power offered by personal computers nowadays. If you're active in the
+field of media and visual art, dance or scenografy, this software can
+be interesting and sometimes very useful to your research.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary> FreeJ </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<para>
+<ulink url="http://freej.dyne.org">FreeJ</ulink> is a vision mixer: an
+instrument for realtime video manipulation used in the fields of dance
+teather, veejaying, medical visualisation and TV.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+FreeJ lets you interact with multiple layers of video, filtered by
+effect chains and then mixed together. Controllers can be scripted for
+keyboard, midi and joysticks, to manipulate images, movies, live
+cameras, particle generators, text scrollers, flash animations and
+more. All the resulting video mix can be shown on multiple and remote
+screens, encoded into a movie and streamed live to the internet.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+FreeJ can be controlled locally or remotely, also from multiple places
+at the same time, using its slick console interface; can be automated
+via javascript and operated via MIDI and Joystick. Especially the
+javascript interpreted makes it an easy to learn language to make your
+first step in the wornderful world of programming.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+More documentation on freej can be found
+in <emphasis>/opt/video/share/freej</emphasis> especially the
+scripting
+reference. A <ulink url="http://lab.dyne.org/FreejTutorialPiotr_01">user
+friendly tutorial</ulink> can be found online, and more information at
+its homepage
+on <ulink url="http://freej.dyne.org">freej.dyne.org</ulink>.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary> EffecTV </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+Other tools included in dyne:bolic are useful to be employed in
+different ways on realtime video: <emphasis>EffecTV</emphasis> can
+apply realtime effects to images, one by one, realizing "distortion
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary> Xaos </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+mirrors" and other possible funny uses; <emphasis>Xaos</emphasis> can
+let you explore the psychedelical word of chaos mathematics and
+fractals :)
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary> Pure Data </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+A remarkable piece of software is <emphasis>Pure Data</emphasis> which
+together with various extensions realizes a tool to connect various
+processing units in a visual scripting fashion, to create visionary
+audio machines and interactive video tools.
+
+Pure Data, also called PD, is as powerful as complicated to learn; it
+helps the fact that is getting now adopted by various media-art
+schools around the world as a free and open source for students to
+realize their projects.
+
+From the wide community of digital artists and creatives using it in
+all kinds of interactive installations and performances, the Goto10
+crew joined the development of dyne:II to implement the
+<emphasis>pure.dyne</emphasis> software module which provides you
+everything you need to start using Pure Data right out of the box,
+without installation problems: check their website at <ulink
+url="http://puredyne.goto10.org">http://puredyne.goto10.org</ulink> to
+download a copy and add it to your dyne:bolic system.
+
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+
+<section>
+<title>Play</title>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary> Xine </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary> Mplayer </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary> FFMpeg </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<para>
+Players are provided to playback various video formats as AVI, MPEG,
+DIVX and WMV files, signals from TV cards or Quicktime, RTSP and HTTP
+live streams from the net. At the time being, dyne:bolic is
+compatible with most of the video formats around: thanks to
+<emphasis>MPlayer</emphasis>, <emphasis>Xine</emphasis> and
+<emphasis>FFMpeg</emphasis> free software you have chances to view
+files otherwise unsupported by other proprietary systems.
+
+Xine is recommended for watching DVDs, while Xawtv is a fully featured
+television viewer. Mplayer will be used to playback videofiles
+whenever you'll doubleclick one in the file manager (to close mplayer
+then you have to press 'q').
+
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>Record</title>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary> Mencoder </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<para>
+
+Video recording is supported using a vast number of devices: from
+TV/video card and DVD using <emphasis>MEncoder</emphasis>, a
+commandline tool to be used from an XTerminal, a bit complicated but
+very powerful, see it's manual. An user-friendly interface for DV
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary> Kino </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+acquisition via firewire is provided by <emphasis>Kino</emphasis>;
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary> XawTV </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+while <emphasis>XawTV</emphasis> supports all other types of video
+devices and can be good to check if your is recognized as it has the
+widest support for hardware.
+
+</para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section>
+<title>Edit</title>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary> Cinelerra </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+Inside dyne:bolic you'll find <emphasis>Cinelerra</emphasis>, which
+implements a common approach to non-linear editing, with a nice user
+interface, speed and responsiveness.
+
+<para>
+You can be introduced to <emphasis>Cinelerra</emphasis> by the manual
+available
+on <ulink url="http://manual.cinelerra.org">manual.cinelerra.org</ulink>
+or
+this <ulink url="http://www.robfisher.net/video/cinelerra1.html">online
+tutorial</ulink>.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary> AviDeMux </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+Also <emphasis>AviDeMux</emphasis> is a useful tool for quickly
+cutting video, supports even more input formats than Cinelerra and can
+be used to convert between some formats and do simple editing tasks.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+Consider that video editing tasks are the most demanding, so you'll
+need a relatively fast computer (from 2004-2005) in order to achieve
+decent interactivity and satisfactory results.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary> Transcode </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+For converting between video formats its included the powerful
+<emphasis>Transcode</emphasis> tool, which is a commandline application
+that can be scripted to convert large number of files or easily accessed
+via a graphical interface.
+</para>
+
+</section> <!-- /EDIT -->
+
+
+
+
+<section>
+<title>Stream</title>
+
+<para>
+
+Streaming video can be easily setted up in three different ways: using
+<emphasis>Mpeg4IP</emphasis>, <emphasis>FreeJ</emphasis> or
+<emphasis>HasciiCam</emphasis>.
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary> Mpeg4IP </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+With <emphasis>Mpeg4IP</emphasis> you'll stream in Mpeg4 format and
+you'll need an online server running Darwin broadcast software, the
+resulting stream can be watched with most video players available
+today on various platform. This method provides good quality and
+smooth framerate, can record while streaming, efficiently uses
+bandwidth when running on multicast and can stream audio synced with
+the video. It's drawbacks are that it can be hard to find or setup a
+broadcast server, slower machines can't stream neither play it (cpu
+intensive).
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary> FreeJ </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+With <emphasis>FreeJ</emphasis> you can combine different video
+sources, apply effects and overlay text, put transparent images and
+even more, then all the resulting stream can be live encoded with the
+free Theora codec and sent to an Icecast2 server online, this way
+anyone will be able to take your stream from the internet and play it
+back for example using
+the <ulink url="http://www.videolan.org">VideoLan</ulink> player
+available for all computer platforms. The capability of mixing and
+effecting the video realtime is a unique feature of FreeJ, but the
+drawback can be the initial difficulty you can encounter in mastering
+the program, which has to be started with particular flags from an
+XTerminal in order to activate the streaming functionality. To find
+out more about it see the previous section about VeeJaying and check
+the <ulink url="http://lab.dyne.org/FreejStreaming">Streaming with
+FreeJ</ulink> documentation online. In dyne:bolic you will find an
+example script to stream
+in <emphasis>/opt/video/share/freej</emphasis>
+
+</para>
+
+<para>
+
+<indexterm><primary> Video </primary>
+<secondary> HasciiCam </secondary>
+</indexterm>
+
+<emphasis>Hasciicam</emphasis> is Rasta software, the first one
+Jaromil ever published (2000), distributed by dyne.org. It is capable
+of rendering a video into text, having letters in place of colors,
+filling up the image as a greyscale palette. With such an encoding the
+images look way less detailed, but pretty cool, and the stream uses
+very low bandwidth: Hasciicam can upload video via ftp to a server and
+can be viewed directly from any web browser (also text based) - so it
+can work to provide a video stream even using very old computers, and
+adds a special bit to it: the ASCII chars. As drawbacks here we have
+that the video is formed of characters: nifty, but doesn't gives a
+clear picture, it is just monochrome and can't achieve a smooth
+framerate on movement. For more informations on how to use
+see <emphasis>man hasciicam</emphasis>.
+
+</para>
+
+
+</section> <!-- /STREAM -->
+
+
+</chapter> <!-- VIDEO -->
+
+
diff --git a/dynebolic/Makefile b/dynebolic/Makefile
index b6dfa65..0c33286 100644
--- a/dynebolic/Makefile
+++ b/dynebolic/Makefile
@@ -4,71 +4,103 @@
# list of all files
DEPS = \
dynebolic-manual.sgml \
-intro.sgml \
-system.sgml \
-video.sgml \
-audio.sgml \
-text.sgml \
-index.sgml
+EN/intro.sgml \
+EN/system.sgml \
+EN/video.sgml \
+EN/audio.sgml \
+EN/text.sgml
-all : index pdf html
+
+DSSSL-print = ../dsssl-stylesheets-1.79/print/docbook.dsl
+DSSSL-pdf = ../dsssl-stylesheets-1.79/pdf/docbook.dsl
+DSSSL-html = ../dsssl-stylesheets-1.79/html/docbook.dsl
+
+# DSSSL-html = /usr/share/sgml/docbook/stylesheet/dsssl/modular/html/docbook.dsl
+# DSSSL-print = /usr/share/sgml/docbook/stylesheet/dsssl/modular/print/docbook.ds
+# DSSSL-pdf = /usr/share/sgml/docbook/stylesheet/dsssl/modular/print/docbook.dsl
+
+# check which language is set to compile, english is default
+# to choose another language run: make man-language=ES
+man-language ?= EN
+
+
+
+
+all : lang index pdf html
+
+lang: dynebolic-manual-$(man-language).sgml
+ ln -sf ../dynebolic-manual.sgml $(man-language)/dynebolic-manual-$(man-language).sgml
# jade omissis options: -V nochunks
index :
- collateindex.pl -N -o index.sgml -t index
- rm -f HTML.index
- jade -wno-valid -t sgml -V html-index -d dsssl-stylesheets-1.79/html/docbook.dsl dynebolic-manual.sgml >/dev/null
- collateindex.pl -o index.sgml HTML.index
- rm -f HTML.index *.htm
+ collateindex.pl -N -o $(man-language)/index.sgml -t index
+ rm -f $(man-language)/HTML.index
+ cd $(man-language) && openjade -wno-valid -t sgml -V html-index \
+ -d $(DSSSL-html) -D $(man-language) \
+ dynebolic-manual-$(man-language).sgml >/dev/null
+ collateindex.pl -o $(man-language)/index.sgml $(man-language)/HTML.index
+ rm -f $(man-language)/HTML.index $(man-language)/*.htm
html : $(DEPS)
rm -rf html/*.htm
- images/convert_for_html.sh
- docbook2html -d dsssl-stylesheets-1.79/html/docbook.dsl \
- -o html dynebolic-manual.sgml
+ images/convert_for_html.sh $(man-language) html
+ cd $(man-language) && docbook2html -u -d $(DSSSL-html) \
+ -o html dynebolic-manual-$(man-language).sgml
pdf : $(DEPS)
- rm -f dynebolic-manual.pdf
- docbook2pdf -d dsssl-stylesheets-1.79/pdf/docbook.dsl \
- dynebolic-manual.sgml
+ rm -f $(man-language)/dynebolic-manual-$(man-language).pdf
+ images/convert_for_html.sh $(man-language) pdf
+ cd $(man-language) && docbook2pdf -d $(DSSSL-pdf) \
+ dynebolic-manual-$(man-language).sgml
+
+
+txt : $(DEPS)
+ rm -f $(man-language)/dynebolic-manual-$(man-language).txt
+ cd $(man-language) && docbook2txt -d $(DSSSL-print) \
+ dynebolic-manual-$(man-language).sgml
+
+
+texi : $(DEPS)
+ rm -f $(man-language)/dynebolic-manual-$(man-language).txt
+ cd $(man-language) && docbook2texi -d $(DSSSL-print) \
+ dynebolic-manual-$(man-language).sgml
+
+info : $(DEPS) texi
+ cd $(man-language); \
+ (makeinfo --force dynebolic-manual-$(man-language).texi 2>/dev/null; return 0)
+
book : $(DEPS)
rm -f dynebolic-manual.pdf
- docbook2pdf -d dsssl-stylesheets-1.79/print/docbook.dsl \
+ docbook2pdf -d $(DSSSL-print) -D $(man-language) \
dynebolic-manual.sgml
postscript : $(DEPS)
rm -f dynebolic-manual.pdf
- docbook2ps -d dsssl-stylesheets-1.79/print/docbook.dsl \
+ docbook2ps -d $(DSSSL-print) -D $(man-language) \
dynebolic-manual.sgml
rtf : $(DEPS)
rm -f dynebolic-manual.rtf
- docbook2rtf -d dsssl-stylesheets-1.79/pdf/docbook.dsl \
+ docbook2rtf -d $(DSSSL-pdf) -D $(man-language) \
dynebolic-manual.sgml
tex : $(DEPS)
rm -f dynebolic-manual.tex
- docbook2tex -d dsssl-stylesheets-1.79/print/docbook.dsl \
+ docbook2tex -d $(DSSSL-print) -D $(man-language) \
dynebolic-manual.sgml
dvi : $(DEPS)
rm -f dynebolic-manual.dvi
- docbook2dvi -d dsssl-stylesheets-1.79/print/docbook.dsl \
+ docbook2dvi -d $(DSSSL-print) -D $(man-language) \
dynebolic-manual.sgml
man : $(DEPS)
rm -f dynebolic.man
- docbook2man -d dsssl-stylesheets-1.79/html/docbook.dsl \
+ docbook2man -d $(DSSSL-html) -D $(man-language) \
dynebolic-manual.sgml
-txt : $(DEPS)
- rm -f dynebolic-manual.txt
- docbook2txt -d dsssl-stylesheets-1.79/html/docbook.dsl \
- dynebolic-manual.sgml
-
-
clean :
rm -f html/*.htm \
diff --git a/dynebolic/html/dyne.css b/dynebolic/dyne.css
index 1d5d729..1d5d729 100644
--- a/dynebolic/html/dyne.css
+++ b/dynebolic/dyne.css
diff --git a/dynebolic/images/convert_for_html.sh b/dynebolic/images/convert_for_html.sh
index 21696e6..833c35c 100755
--- a/dynebolic/images/convert_for_html.sh
+++ b/dynebolic/images/convert_for_html.sh
@@ -1,11 +1,27 @@
#!/bin/sh
-mkdir -p html/images
+lang=$1
+target=$2
+
+case $target in
+ html)
+ outdir="$lang/html/images"
+ ;;
+ pdf)
+ outdir="$lang/images"
+ ;;
+ *)
+ echo "ERROR in image/convert.sh - must specify a target, i.e: convert.sh EN html"
+ exit 0
+ ;;
+esac
+
+mkdir -p $outdir
for i in `ls images/*.png`; do
file="`basename $i | cut -d. -f1`"
echo "converting $file to jpeg"
- convert $i "html/images/${file}"
+ convert $i "$outdir/${file}"
done
-echo "images prepared in html/images"
+echo "images prepared in $outdir"